Aural History: How Studio 360 Began

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S1: This ad free podcast is part of your slate plus membership.

S2: I’m Kurt Anderson and this is the Studio 360 podcast.

S3: You’re invited to rock the World Wrestling Federation champion to speak at the Republican National Convention. What’s the matter?

S4: It to me. I became an official painter of the Khmer Rouge. I don’t express political desires in my novels. I just tell a story.

S5: Hello, I’m Kurt Andersen and this is STUDIO 360.

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S6: That’s how Studio 360 began its first episode on November 4, 2000. Just before we elected George W. Bush and we all learned what a hanging chad was.

S5: My special guest today in Studio 360 is the artist Barbara KRUGER, who will talk with us about politics and power in movies and music.

S7: And even in her own art, I make art about the collision of my days and nights with the culture that has constructed and contains me.

S8: All that and more coming up in Studio 360 from WNYC, NPR Public Radio International.

S6: Originally produced out of WNYC here in New York, the show is all about the cool but complicated and sometimes strange ways that art touches our lives. Two decades later, that mission hasn’t changed, even if the people making the show have come and gone. I’m Jocelyn Gonzalez, executive producer of Studio 360. But I was a still wet behind the ears associate producer when the show debuted two decades ago. I was away from the show for about 10 years before returning to the staff in 2017. So as the show draws to a close, sadly, after 20 years, I turned to some of my friends from the formative years of Studio 360 for their impressions.

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S9: Could we create these beautiful stories that represent all sorts of interesting things that are going on in the country in terms of arts and then have Kurt sit with some of that he was comfortable with and talk about them?

S10: That’s Julie Burstein, who was executive producer of Studio 360 when the show launched and who wrote the Studio 360 book called Spark in 2011. And this is Carrie Hillman, who was our first senior producer and is now the executive producer at StoryCorps.

S11: At the time, there had been a lot of magazine shows and it was a way for us to sort of do something different and fresh. And it was like a really creative solution to like a lot of really boring magazine formatted programming. So I was like, really game to try to figure it out. We also had two assistant producers.

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S12: I’m Michelle SIEGEL. I started at Studio 360 as a assistant producer in September of 2000. I stayed through 2013 as a producer, and I’m now the managing producer of Slate Studios.

S13: I’m Lee Tall Mallard and I started at Studio 360 as an intern in the year 2000 and I was there until 2015. When I left. I was senior producer of the show for about 10 years before that. And I now work at Pushkin Industries, heading up development.

S10: Also on staff during the early days of the show was producer and technical director Steve Nelson. Steve’s now a programming executive at NPR.

S14: Josslyn, do you remember what the working title was when we got there? Oh, yeah, it was hot ticket, right? Which is it? First of all, a terrible name and doesn’t get to any of the big ideas that Studio 360 does has a name. But secondly, this is sort of in the relatively I guess this was during the post.com boom and someone typed in hot ticket dot com into a Web site. And it was an adult site. Not for general audiences for sure. That was the end of hot ticket as a name.

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S15: Every week in Studio 360, we explore one big idea in depth. Today, we look at the intersections of art and medicine.

S11: The idea of Studio 360 or an art show for public radio had been kind of kicking around for a long time. People were on the ground producing pieces, trying to sort of see what would stick. Eventually they brought Julie Burstein on and she had this idea of like putting on pieces that sort of built on one another and having an artist or somebody else react to each piece.

S9: We’ve started calling it a throughline, which was just an idea that we would carry through the show. And I think that the idea of having a theme came from we have to have some structure in order inside it to be able to play.

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S11: The idea was that Kurt would open the show with a sort of monologue.

S15: It is always delightful to look back and see that exotic bits of Seville is actually in. John Ashcroft was a senator. His most celebrated crusade, a failed crusade for some years now. One of my hobbyhorses has been the blurring lines between news, politics, crime, war and entertainment.

S11: And then he would have a person in the studio. With him, and then we would present pre recorded pieces to play for this person.

S16: I try in my work to speak to the human in us and that human end to bear kind of witness.

S11: And then they would react to it. Oh, that’s really fascinating. That makes me think of this.

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S17: Yes. We looked a lot at the degeneration of people’s memories. And one of the pieces of research we discovered is precisely which I why I found listening to that piece so fascinating.

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S11: So it would give us an opportunity to say something that took them off of their typical talking points. It gave us some of an insight into the way they think their personality. It also added some depth, I think, to the pieces themselves, because, you know, you can’t do everything in five minutes. And so maybe you have to like leave something on the cutting room floor, but you can resurrect it a little bit with it with a like well-placed curt question. So I thought it was really cool.

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S9: I loved gathering stories from really disparate places and putting them next to each other and then talking about them. It was just so much fun. Do you remember a point when you realized it was working? I have to say, I think that first Shakespeare show, because it was a whole show bringing Shakespeare up to date. But we had Neil Gaiman.

S8: Well, he’s just grumbling about the fact that he’s a crappy writer. And the Sandman, the eponymous Lord of Dreams who happens to be in this pub, goes over to well and offers him a deal.

S18: Are you will Shakespeare? I said, have we met? We have.

S9: But men forget in waking hours and you and Steve or maybe it was Steve did that incredible intro. He started it with Schwarzenegger saying to be or not to be.

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S19: Not to be.

S4: There is a tide in the affairs of men when in disgrace with fortune and men’s home boys and girls, have we here?

S5: Hello, I’m Kurt Anderson and this is STUDIO 360. Can just do it.

S20: So little areas. And it was just it was like, OK, we got it. This works.

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S21: I’m Peter clowny and I was studio 360’s first editor. And these days I live in St. Paul and I’m V.P. of content and strategy for Stitcher. It’s a struggle sometimes to do a show that has a theme. I approached that idea with caution now. If someone wants to do a show that a theme, I’d like to say like, remember, it’s got multiple pieces in it.

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S22: You’re gonna have your fifth favorite piece about gardens in this episode. But it’s true that like building on the ideas across an hour is like really meaningful.

S23: My name is Eric Molinsky. I started as an intern in 2004, became assistant producer and then decided to become a contributing reporter, of which I was to Studio 360 through the beginning of 2016. And I am now the host and creator of the podcast Imaginary Worlds. Yeah, I remember there’s one episode where they got they Madeleine Albright. The throughline theme was democracy.

S24: And so she’s sitting in the studio with Current. Then one of the pieces was about American Idol, which was the hottest thing back then. And they were talking about how people were taking American Idol democracy far more seriously than actual presidential elections. Have you ever had a chance to see American Idol?

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S25: Well, I actually have. And I’ve been pretty depressed, as I am by television generally these days, which seems to be going to the lowest common denominator. And, you know, I don’t like the word elite ism as we kind of lost me on this last segment.

S24: And it was really funny here. Madeleine Albright come out of that piece and me like, what do you think of that? She is not too thrilled with the piece, the quality of the piece. But what she was hearing in the piece.

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S26: I’m Derek John. I was a producer and editor on the show from about 2004 to 2012 ish. And since then, I’ve done a whole bunch of work in the podcast world. But I am now currently an executive producer of the How To with Troll’s do his podcast at Slate when the theme through line shows worked. Man, they were amazing. I mean, it was like we had set this high bar and they were so hard to pull off, but when they clicked and everything fit together, yeah, it was truly fantastic radio.

S20: And it was hard. I would say we had some shows that weren’t successful.

S9: And that’s actually what led to having to change.

S13: One really terrible line thematic show was fish wait for fish, just literal fish in the sea. The animals really jumped the shark on.

S27: The 1980 film The Apple is essentially the Orpheus myth.

S22: By way of the Rocky Horror Picture Show, I think the show that broke the camel’s back was our goal. The theme was the Orpheus Myth. There was a certain executive at WNYC, came in, had a talk to it with us afterwards and said, this isn’t working.

S24: I have no memory of value. A listener apparently wrote in and said I felt like I was being dragged through a museum on a Saturday morning, starting a radio show with a different theme every week.

S28: And so many moving parts should have required a team of experienced professionals. But that wasn’t the case with Studio 360. In fact, the staff was pretty new to making radio and that meant a lot of running around and breaking stuff.

S12: I was an assistant professor, but I don’t have any technical background. Josslyn, you gave me this assignment is like just go write a promo. And I didn’t even know, like, what the elements of that would be. Next time on STUDIO 360. What’s the new matter anyway? It’s our last day. Can we say goodbye? And I remember just grabbing my right around. So that was that was great to be kind of just being thrown into the fire.

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S22: In my interview, they brought up this list of things they needed the editor to do. And it was like three pages. They need a hands like willing hands. God knows they could have said no and I would’ve respected the decision.

S29: So my name is Sarah Lilly and I started at Studio 360 in 2002. I came in as an intern, as a intern in my mid thirties. I had never I hadn’t done any radio stuff. And I was coming from the music business. I was looking for a career change at the time. I reached out to Julie and I was just like, let me just come in and observe or whatever. And that’s when I met Carrie, who immediately was like, well, you could open this pile of mail or we could just find out what else you could do.

S30: I’m David Cross. Now, eyes darted on the show as a freelance reporter and producer in around 2001. Early days on the show, I joined the staff as an associate producer and then I was the editor of the show until 2015. And now I’m the executive producer of The New Yorker Radio Hour. I had been a writer when I pitched a story and had it accepted. I don’t think I mentioned to anybody that I’d never I had never used recording equipment before. Do owned recording equipment. We knew. You didn’t know? We didn’t know. We knew. I redid my first interview like two or three times because I literally did not know how to hold a microphone.

S14: So for me, I was supposed to do a production job, a lot of mixing of audio, cutting audio. And they asked me in the interview, hey, do you know how to use Pro Tools? Pro Tools? Of course. A audio editing program. I’m like, oh, yeah, I know how to use Pro Tools. But here’s a secret. I did not know how to use Pro Tools. I had never used it before in my life. So I had to, like, train myself on how to use Pro Tools. In the five days before the Pro Tools Test, I was doing the Tools Test and about two hours into it. It crashed. I lost all the work that I had done because I hadn’t saved. And I went back to Judith Kampfner, who was the hiring manager, I said, and I just lost all my work. She’s like, How long will it take you to get it done? Like, I just need forty five minutes. Mix the piece. They hired me.

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S28: Fake it till you make a heroic story of lying whole Italy. So everyone was learning on the job, including our host before hosting Studio 360.

S10: Kurt Andersen co-founded Spy magazine and was a writer, editor, columnist, a design and architecture critic and a playwright. He’d also just written a novel Turn of the Century, which came out in 1999.

S31: He’d written plays. He’d done work for television. I mean, he just was a renaissance person in the arts and in journalism. And that was exactly the kind of person we were looking for.

S10: That’s Melinda Ward, the former chief content officer for Public Radio International and creator of Studio 360. And here’s Julie Burstein again.

S9: I remember that lunch that I had with him when I was interviewing for the job. And he said, you know, I’ve been working with a vocal coach to try to get me to not sound like I grew up in Omaha. That didn’t work well.

S20: I said to him, we’re firing that person because you need to sound like you. If you sound like just yet another announcer with a announcer voice, this show is gonna fail. So you got to sound like yourself.

S32: Good morning. I have realized over the years that I am always, I think, much better at this. If I’ve worked every Sunday. It’s my super villain name. I speak Spanish. I’m Cisco. I knew this song as a child who grew out, had a 45 with this record, in fact. Oh, this is the end. And I’m Kurt Andersen. Thanks very much for listening.

S14: So for me, I was I would always record Kurt in his sessions and I was in some of his first sessions. And, you know, he was brand new at doing it. He wasn’t sure what P popping was. He didn’t know how close to sit to the microphone. He didn’t know what a pickup was. It was fun to help someone sort of figure all that stuff out in the interviews.

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S12: I said, I feel like it took him a while to loosen up.

S9: I’m just gonna say that pairing him with interesting people felt like the best way to use him. So in those early days, we just looked for really cool, funny, interesting people for him to sit down with and that got him excited to come into the office and into the studio and do that. And I still remember the day that Susan Sontag came in.

S33: People do feel turned off or indifferent to images of horror and war and suffering that they see and that they feel indignant about. I think it’s comes not because they’re blasé, but because they feel impotent or powerless. And I think that’s a perfectly understandable reaction.

S9: And I saw Kurt in our conference room and the look on his face of sort of terror was really powerful. But I knew he would do a great job, but I could see that this was like the first person we’d ever had in the studio that he was a bit in awe of. It was just this powerful show about how artists have looked at war since Homer. And she was phenomenal.

S34: And he did a great job due to fuel. But I’ll do whatever you say. OK.

S11: Will you show him how Cassandra’s Kurt went into a lot of different situations that required lots of different levels of sort of being alert to possibilities. We just threw so much stuff at him. And, you know, it’s a different kind of show and that he didn’t generate all the ideas, but he would rarely say no.

S26: I remember doing this segment on this guy had come up with this talk show within the video game Halo. And we had Kurt like, go and be like an avatar in the game.

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S35: They’re shooting people. I’m trying to defend us here. You need to move faster. Kurt, I’m sorry.

S26: I mean, it seems funny to think about it now, but like at the time, it was super crazy and cutting edge at this guy had figured out how to sort of hack the game and had this whole like virtual reality.

S12: Six months after Katrina, we planned a trip to go to New Orleans, really figuring out how they were going to try to solve this problem of how to kind of rebuild the city and what the design questions were around that.

S15: All the water is gone now, of course, but the wreckage that remains is absolutely shocking.

S36: Presumably, the people in this neighborhood are among those who a great many of them, majority of them perhaps didn’t have.

S37: That’s right. They didn’t have a choice.

S12: I think that’s one of the great travesties of Katrina, is we went on a trip to New Orleans for a few days to how to kind of produce it and get all the different voices together. But, you know, he’s always been really passionate about design and kind of see him step up and really tap into the human element of what was going on there. It wasn’t just like an architecture issue. It was about people’s homes and lives. It was really interesting to see him in that element because so often he is just in a studio.

S30: And actually, one of my favorite memories of working with him in the studio was a program that we did in 2014 and it was our 1914 episode. And we produced the whole thing as though we had been on the air in 1914.

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S38: In today’s programme, we present to through the medium of radio some singular developments taking place in the arts today in literature, drama, music and the medium of moving pictures, new technologies, new ideas are changing what we, the American people create and how we are entertained.

S30: He delivered it in that crazy old timey voice that people used to use for broadcast announcing and our technical director at that time, John to Laura, who brought in a megaphone like a Victrola horn and had Kurt record threw it into the mike to compress everything down. I mean, I’ve seen Kurt Geek out on many wonderful occasions, but I have never seen him geek out that joyfully.

S38: It may not be able to speculate, but later generations will look back upon 1914 as a remarkable year, perhaps the year in which the 20th century truly began.

S39: This week on the podcast, we’re looking back at the early years of Studio 360, which is drawing to a close after two decades of covering arts and culture on the radio. After the first year on the air, the show was finding its groove and its audience.

S10: But then in the fall of 2001, the unthinkable happened.

S40: There has been an explosion at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. The upper floors of the northern tower at the World Trade Center has experienced an explosion.

S10: Studio 360’s original offices were at WNYC in the municipal building at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge, just blocks away from the World Trade Center.

S31: I remember coming in to work in Minneapolis and hearing on the radio about the hit on the towers and then coming into PR I. And of course, the WNYC studios were right under the Twin Towers. You’re right next to them and the subway. A lot of people took came up under the Twin Towers. So we were. Horrified and terrified and terribly worried about a whole WNYC staff and Studio 360 staff found out later that Julie Burstein had been in the office and she had had she left WNYC and had to walk all the way up the west side of Manhattan to think it was her brother’s apartment or something. Took all day and now coughing and choking and nobody knew what was going on. And then, you know, the decision was that we needed to put a show out.

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S41: The subtlest change in New York, he wrote, it’s something people don’t speak about much, but that is in everyone’s mind. The city for the first time in its long history is destructible.

S11: It might have been Curt. Could’ve been Julia. But just saying like, we need to do something beautiful.

S42: We need to produce something that is like a salve for people right now. And that’s sort of what we set out to do.

S43: The reason rage happens, whether it’s someone you love dying from AIDS or your parents with Alzheimer’s or cancer, is you can’t do anything about it. And one of the things about this particular tragedy that we all are very much aware of is how helpless we are.

S44: It was so shocking going through that experience.

S45: So like early in my tenure, being in New York City, first of all, but then also with the new show, and it was a heavy time, I think, for all of us.

S42: That was such an extraordinary show and so hard to make happen. And the response we got from people all over the country was extraordinary.

S28: After that moment, it seemed even more important that we present thoughtful conversations about the role of art in our society. In recent years, we’ve looked at Art’s response to violence, talked with playwrights exploring racism or examine classic books and pop songs for their gender politics. What sets Studio 360 apart was the show’s emphasis on craft process and inspiration from episodes on color editing and criticism to shows about creativity at the office or art inspired by voyeurism and surveillance. Studio 360 was so much more than new releases and reviews against a flat gray, overcast sky and a few pine trees.

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S46: Five shirtless young guys in blue jeans straddle motorbikes in a muddy clearing in the woods. They sport tribal monster makeup and spiky wigs. They stretch out their arms, curl their fingers, demon style, and look right at you from the canvas. It’s curious and, well, creepy.

S12: So when The Royal Tenenbaums came out, we weren’t just going to interview was Anderson. And then I found out a weird way in which was the the velvet Elvis paintings that were hanging in one of the shots. And we found the artist and we talked about the whole origins of how this painting came about. And it was basically like a set design story. And we still that Wes Anderson in the story. But it wasn’t about him and it wasn’t really about the movie.

S30: And it was just kind of like this really weird way in for the listener who hasn’t seen or doesn’t like a Wes Anderson movie. What are they going to connect to in this piece or for someone who doesn’t like, you know, baroque music or rap or video games? What are they going to connect to in this thing? Like what is what is the human element that’s interesting here beyond like, oh, yeah, I should go by that next week that we asked that all the time and often fought bitterly over what what the answers should be.

S9: We had a lot of yelling.

S24: I remember the early editorial there was that Kurt used to always say that that no art should be too highbrow or lowbrow for us. People in the arts can be incredibly snobby about other kinds of arts that they’re like. This is what I do that I will not touch. And the idea that I could do an episode about comic books, which is something that I care a lot about. But then I could do a piece about Mahler, whatever professional wrestling, an opera can go in the same show and that they’re both forms of art and that, you know, essentially don’t yank somebody else’s yum.

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S14: When the show started, no one had really heard of the show and booking big names was impossible. And I think because of that, we had to be scrappy and make sure that we were telling interesting stories with big ideas that the audiences wanted to hear. And that ethos, I think, stayed with the show the entire time.

S22: But it’s also why I interviewed my father in law a couple times about his blacksmithing. I did shows about puppets. Steve teased me for years about how a piece I did about like activist puppets where I had like a very sincere line in there that like puppets are heavy.

S34: Bits are heavy. That’s my art. That sounds deeper than what it actually was. Exactly.

S47: All of our lofty intentions in our pursuit of craft and meaning didn’t stop us from occasionally missing our mark.

S22: We tried some stupid things. That’s true, but we did. The road trip shows were like, we know, like have Kurt and ofpower just drive and we’ll talk and play the pieces. Well, turns out awkward car conversations are just as bad as when they turn into radio.

S14: Yeah, we did it. We did one in Central Park. I remember we just sat there, scouted a location on the beach.

S35: I’m Kurt Anderson and we have brought Studio 360 to Coney Island. My guests today are John Plans, Burt and John Linnell. In other words, the wonderful band, they might be giants where the wind was just howling.

S4: And we like really we’re going to have a thoughtful discussion with the waves crashing has a terrible idea.

S22: And then you got to make your show out of that. I mean, you don’t get to do it again. Like, yeah, we did some dumb things.

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S28: My friend hits and misses aside. A lot of that work was preparing us for the more ambitious goals of Studio 360’s American Icon series.

S48: You just drift around in this book and you can read it in little chunks because there is no plot. I mean, you know the plot. The ship’s going to go down. That’s it.

S49: Maybe by.

S20: American icons, like so many, like the show itself, grew out of our extraordinary leader at PR High, Melinda Ward.

S9: She and I talked about it and then I brought it to the team and we figured out, all right, how might we do something about American work? Old American work, not contemporary American work.

S24: We first look at something that everybody knew. You know, the Lincoln Memorial, The Great Gatsby, they’re just things that people you just say and everybody knows and all these images come into your head. And then we would try to sort of show you the real story that very often the origin of what created that thing, that there are so many forces happening in culture, in history that we would sort of bring you back to that time when that thing didn’t exist and what it was that brought that thing into fruition. It’s usually things in society that are still the same today and are still really resonant. How how is this reverberated throughout the culture and sometimes in ways we don’t even realize. I mean, we end up connecting Buffalo Bills, Wild West Show. I think eventually to Avatar.

S27: Tell them they’re going to be here soon. Yeah, you have to leave. You’re going to die.

S41: It is totally opposed. 60S Western the planet Pandora is a new frontier full of natural wonder and mysticism and adventure. The aliens are noble savages, hunted down by settlers, and they fight a last stand against a crazy, vicious military commander that they can take whatever.

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S30: And most of those works are celebrated. And also, to some extent, like hated and reviled. They help articulate particular struggles in the culture. If you think about something like the House of Mirth, which is so much about money and the role of women in society and the lack of options, the lack of options. Over time, we always were thinking about who hated something. And as we were evaluating ideas more and more, I started saying, if nobody hates this thing, it’s probably not worth doing. It’s gonna be a sort of boring hour like we did not want them to be. Simple celebrations of great American works. I should say that and like say it again. We did not want them to be simple celebrations of great American works and something that really touched America at its core, which sometimes like Hertzel.

S50: Nowadays we don’t play it to take away all the greatness that America is supposed to have. We play it the way the air is in America today.

S51: The air is slightly static. It’s like the zygotes bomb made up this moment, this thing. But it was also the soundtrack of a country tearing itself apart in real time.

S52: I’m Jenny Lawton. I started in 2007 as an assistant producer and wrapped up as executive producer in 2017.

S53: I had the great good fortune of getting to work on two American icons. Ours one about I Love Lucy and the other was about the Disney parks.

S54: I’m standing on a main street in the middle of America at the dawn of the 20th century. It’s early morning. There are shopkeepers in pinstripes and straw boaters. They’re smiling as they open up their shops. Jewel box store fronts sparkle in the sunshine. This is Main Street USA.

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S55: It’s not just some old shopping mall. It’s a dream version of an American small town. It’s perfect. Like an old movie Come to life. And I’m the star.

S56: When we arrived at the parks to do our taping, we entered through backstage. And backstage is the area where all the cast members and performers and crew have all their gear and their stuff away from guests so they don’t see how the magic happens. Without spoiling anything, I can say that backstage looks like backstage. It’s it’s not it’s pretty unremarkable. And it really spoke to the cynic in me. But then we take a step out into the Magic Kingdom. And the first thing that we see is a little kid had to be like three years old meeting Goofy. One of the big furry characters. The look on this kid’s face, just the absolute joy of that moment felt pretty transformational for me, too.

S45: I mean, they’re beautiful documentaries and they’re so elegantly produced. Right. They sound great. You want to be in them. And it was an opportunity for, you know, a team that is like, you know, cranking shows out every week to be able to sort of pause and be really sort of thoughtful about producing something that, you know, is really timeless.

S56: When I got the job in Studio 360, I was super excited to join the show for all sorts of reasons, but I have to admit one of them was just getting to work in the municipal building. It is just this gorgeous building with a turret on top. And I can always point to it and say I work up in there.

S45: I remember flying in for my interview and like walking toward the Brooklyn Bridge and seeing the building and having like a really Mary Tyler Moore moment. You know, it’s like I have a right to that flag. And I’m like, oh, no.

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S28: Throwback to the salad days of Studio 360 would be complete without more than a passing mention of our original offices at WNYC. We had a small circular space to ourselves on the 30th floor with a tiny studio, a conference room and a bunch of little cubicles. We’ve since moved with they’ll be on my C to more industrial chic offices in Tribeca. And finally we landed here in the Open Plan Space at Slate magazine in downtown Brooklyn. But the old Studio 360 crew still identifies with the show’s first home to give people a picture.

S24: Studio 360 WNYC was in the Manhattan Municipal Building, which looks like a giant wedding cake. It is a Beaux Arts style early 20th century, like one of the first skyscrapers at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge, because it’s been a government building since the early nineteen hundreds. It had the most minimal upkeep. I mean, this the same building that WNYC had been in since like the era of LaGuardia. The toilets were literally held together with duct tape above David Krauze Downs office was a garbage bag cut open and duct taped around the ceiling to catch all the leaks.

S29: If that building was a wedding cake, we were in the like little plastic bride and groom on the top, which is within in this crazy, crazy little tower where that was like flights up from the, you know, hallways that looked sort of like public school meets meet sanatorium.

S28: What made us content to put up with all of that was the view our office had windows looking out in all directions. Hence the name of the show, Studio 360 from our desks. We could see the city spread out below us, clouds gathering before a storm above us, or hawks swooping by on their way to neighboring buildings.

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S29: I loved it. The view is obscenely good. I mean, people would come up and be like, wow, mean. It was so tiny. But the view is just so, so magnificent.

S26: I will say that that was the best office view I will ever have. And the fact that that essentially was like one of my very first jobs. And I just moved to the big city from Kansas. I mean, there was this kind of romance about it that I had to say. It was just it was amazing to go to work there, even though the ceiling was falling in half the time. Like it really was just an amazing place.

S47: Studio 360 has been an amazing place to work. It’s an incredibly talented group of people from the very first ragtag crew that launched the show to the amazing staff whose work you’ve been listening to in the last couple of years. So on behalf of Kurt and all of my Studio 360 colleagues. Thanks for listening.

S2: Thanks for listening and you can subscribe to Studio 360 wherever you get podcasts.