Freaky

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S1: This ad free podcast is part of your Slate plus membership.

S2: I are you doing right now? I see.

S3: Shila trading for. Yo, yo, yo here.

S1: Hello and welcome to the Slate spoiler special. I’m Sam Adams, the senior editor at Slate. And today will be Spoiling Frickey, a gory slasher movie twist on the classic body swapping comedy. Joining me today is Karen Hahn, a staff writer at Slate. Hello, Karen.

S2: Hi. Yay! It’s my first Slate podcast.

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S1: Right. I’m so glad to be able to say those those words a staff writer at Slate, because a little while. But it just became public this week. So I’m so happy to hear them. As I mentioned, we are discussing the movie Frickey, which was written and directed by Christopher Landon, who I think some of our listeners will know from the Happy Death Day movies. Karen, what did you think of it?

S2: I really liked it, as I was just discussing with one of our colleagues right before recording, like it’s not going to win an Oscar, but it’s tremendously fun. And at this point in the quarantine, I feel like that is kind of a high bar to clear where it’s like I had a good time watching it the whole time and I didn’t really have anything big to complain about. And also, I will say I like horror movies, but I’m also a huge worse. And this came in at a good level for me in terms of not being too scary, but having enough to kind of set me on edge a few times.

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S1: Yeah, like the Happy Death Day movies before this. This is a little bit of a sort of meta slasher movie, tilts a little bit more towards sort of straight forward is a tough word to say, but it’s a it’s a little more in a kind of classic stalker vein, apart from the body swapping part, which we’ll get to serious a little bit less of a kind of Looney Tunes comedy, Happy Death in movies. And I missed some of that comedy in this. Yeah. The Happy Death Day movies had Jessica Roth as the main character who basically gets killed over and over again and a very wily coyote kind of way. And that becomes especially in the second one, just this kind of incredible running gag. And this one, this movie has Catherine Newton kind of in that role. And I think she’s a great actress. I really liked her in Breaker’s and in the Netflix show The Society, which one of I think about three people to watch while I was just about to say I’m surprised that you’ve seen it, I, I really can’t explain it. It’s one of those it’s like a bad show that I just really wanted to finish. So let’s let’s talk a little bit about Millie, the character Catherine Newton plays in this character. You wanted her to give us a capsule description of who Molly is when we enter the story.

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S2: Yeah, for sure. So she’s, I guess, kind of the stereotypical high school Protagoras she like seems really normal to any viewer, but is an outcast at school kind of because everyone else is like a super preppy student. Like, it’s crazy to think that Catherine Newton would be an outcast at any school just because she is a beautiful actress. She seems really charming and great, but the fact that she kind of dresses in a slightly more hipster way is what puts her apart here. On top of that, her character’s father passed away a year ago and she’s kind of been her mother’s primary source of support. And that feeling of obligation has kind of prevented her from really going out and having fun the way that she wants to during high school. And I was also stopping her from applying to colleges that are kind of away from home. But she’s also the school mascot at sports games. And it’s while she’s waiting to get picked up from a game and still wearing the mascot uniform, that she comes across the blissful butchery, which is Vince Vaughn’s character, a serial killer. And during the attempt on her life, the magical dagger that the butcher is wielding causes them to swap bodies. And that puts kind of her high school social status into a bit of a tailspin.

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S1: So, I mean, if you want to get a very clear sense of what kind of movie we’re dealing with here, the sports team at the Bloomfield High where Catherine Newton’s character, Millie, is the mascot and they’re called the Biting Beavers, it’s underlined several more times in the course of the film. But that’s like the level of just kind of, you know, over the top deliberately sophomoric humor we’re dealing with here, which is in the opening scene. And this is kind of when we meet the Busfield Butcher is your classic, you know, sort of stalker movie set up with these, you know, fourteens like their parents are out for the night. They’re kind of rich. They’re, you know, getting too drunk about to have some eventually have some, you know, teenage sex and whatever in the blissful butcher comes in. And just true to form, I guess, butchers them quite graphically. This is a very gory movie.

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S2: Yeah, I was shocked because the first kill and the movie is this kid gets the neck of a wine bottle shoved down his throat and the butcher finally kills him by just smashing the bottle, basically like inside his neck. It’s so gross.

S1: Yeah. And you actually see, like, the shards coming out his side and stuff. That’s horrible. Yeah. I mean, this is this is a movie for anyone who has ever, you know, been recommended a horror movie and asked, what are the kills. Yeah, it’s definitely like playing to that demographic, obviously that the house is owned by this like. Well the. Archaeologist Vince Vaughn steals this, I think at some point they may say Aztec dagger, but it might just be kind of left mysterious, you know, ancient civilization called LA Dola Mili is abandoned, sort of left late at this sports game because her mom’s a drunk. That’s how she’s coping with the death of her husband. And as a result, the police feel better, comes after her stabs her with a knife. The sky goes red. She’s like all of a sudden, you know, there’s an overhead shot of a 50 yard line and all of a sudden they’re like on top of something like Aztec Pyramid, she’s getting to sacrifice or something. And hey presto, at midnight that night, which also happens to take us to Friday the 13th, she wakes up, she is in Vince Vaughn’s body in this very creepily decorated I guess it’s called the Old Mill. We eventually find out and he more importantly, wakes up in Katherine Newton’s body and let’s and this is where he sort of gets underway like it. This is basically Freaky Friday the 13th is what we’re dealing with here. And that sort of gives rise to basically both these actors, Catherine Newton and Vince Vaughn are playing another spirit in their character and that sort of like that, the comedy in the movies, the pathos when it tries where it really like comes from that like what’s it like for this kind of blonde teenage outcast to suddenly be in this, you know, giant, you know, six five Vince Vaughn body. And, you know, what happens to a teenage outcast when she suddenly inhabited by the spirit of like a ruthless serial killer?

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S2: He’s a big man, although I will say kind of the first thing that got me straight off the bat is that one of the big things about the millipede, the, I guess, boutcher to transformation when he’s in her body, when he goes to school the next day, is that he’s suddenly wearing different makeup and different clothes and a high pony. And I was like, how does he know how to do any of that? That’s like, that’s hard for me.

S1: It’s the exact same thought. I mean, I like it. They didn’t overdo it too much. Like, she just comes in, she pulls like a red leather jacket, I think maybe out of her mom’s closet or something. So she’s wearing like, you know, a leather jacket and has like a high ponytail and a sort of a full lip. And it’s like, how does Vincent know how to do this? Exactly. But at least he didn’t give her like she’s just got a high ponytail on. Like, that’s that’s doable. At least it’s like right right on the border.

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S2: It’s harder than you think it would be, is what I’ll say.

S1: As someone with long hair, I’ve done it on an eleven year old head. I know it’s tricky. So Millie comes to school. She seems like Millie, little more confident, a little hotter, a little more of a jerk, which apparently is, you know, in addition to the popular kids, her friends who are played by Misha, Usher Ravich and Celeste O’Connor immediately like, no, something’s wrong. But because Molly doesn’t even know that they’re her friends, she doesn’t know who they are, and she just immediately gravitates with that sort of serial killer radar just immediately gravitates towards the kind of, you know, snotty, popular people at the school, because those are those who that’s two serial killers love to pick off. And why do you what do you describe what happens next, Karen?

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S2: I mean, the butcher basically, as you say, like follows that serial killer radar, which is funny in a movie sense, where it’s like he kills basically everyone that used to bully Molly at school and goes after them, I guess because they also try to they gravitate back towards her and or him. I guess the butcher pronouns are real.

S1: There is actually a line in the movie about like, you know, the pronoun trouble here. Like, it’s it’s tricky, but.

S2: Yeah, but yeah, he in my body goes after everyone who used to pick on me because their attitudes towards her, even their attitudes towards who they perceive to be Molly like haven’t really changed ultimately. And so there’s a weird sense of like schadenfreude where it’s like, oh, they kind of deserve what’s coming to them, which is not what you’d say if this was happening in real life. But it’s like, OK, because it’s a movie or like these people are jerks, like the first school kill is the I guess mean girl equivalent who just kind of relentlessly bullies me for apparently no reason and now really wants to be her friend because she’s a local celebrity after having been stabbed. And then it’s like the jocks get what’s coming to them for being like kind of date rape being weird and bad as well as the Home EC or what shop or Home Economics teacher played by Alan Rock, who dies in maybe the the worst death in this movie.

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S1: I think because he gets vivisected, the worst the best of it depends on your yardstick. Yeah, the most.

S2: Yeah, exactly. Worst. Best death.

S1: So you have a mean girl gets it in a kind of final destination anyway, where she gets locked inside some sort of like cryo unit that they have in the physical therapy room where she gets she gets frozen and then then Vince Vaughn, as Molly so hard to talk about, finds her and opened the thing and she hurt. She just found out. Shatters on the floor and then Milly Busfield Butler moves on to her shop teacher played by Alan Ruck, as you mentioned, who’s just kind of a sublime jerk in this. They think they really make him. Obviously, he’s kind of been back in the spotlight with succession in the last couple of years. This is very much I think, you know, drawing on, you know, his place in Ferris Bueller is kind of like a movie actor who they’re putting into this film.

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S2: I like I will have to say that Mr. Fletcher is so mean. I almost like thought there was going to be more to that just because he’s so almost like sociopath. I mean, towards just amily, especially there’s a certain extent to which the self-defense defense works. When Meely when butcher as Emily is attacking him and he really just goes out on like kicking her when she’s down. And I was like, that’s not like normal. You would run out of there at that point if if someone who was trying to kill you was knocked down. Right.

S1: Right. Yeah, but he’s actually. Yeah. Like really fully like just beating on this the body of this teenage girl, you know, and it’s like the movie. You just you obviously you’re thinking Vince Vaughn, even though you’re looking at Catherine Newton. But you can imagine if somebody walked in and saw him just like, you know, punching this 17 year old girl in the face, that might be a bit of a problem for him. Fortunately for him, he gets that kind of, you know, circular saw split’s him and a half from head to toe. So he doesn’t have to worry about those complaints.

S2: Oh, yeah. Also kind of final destination.

S1: Yes, yeah. Yeah. I mean, I think there’s a lot of, you know, these movies, you know, happy that they was like this in a way too. I think this one, even more so, kind of walks the line of, you know, right between sort of like reference and rip off. There’s so much of that, so familiar from so many other movies. And you’d be like, oh, let’s like, you know, the kill in this movie. That’s like the thing and final destination five or whatever. And you can sort of chocolate all as a reference. But at a certain point it does start to feel like the end of the self-consciousness is not just kind of like a get out of jail free card. Yeah. So meanwhile, wildly is kind of going on this rampage, really. Spirit has woken up in Vince Vaughn’s body and I think Vince Vaughn, like as I said, I love Catherine Newton, but, you know, playing a serial killer, like basically what she needs to do is just look kind of stern and badass. It’s not like, yeah, a huge acting challenge for her. And I think Vince Vaughn playing the body of Vince Vaughn with the spirit of a high school girl. And it is sort of sort of a bigger ask for him.

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S2: Yeah. He just has more to do in the movie, I think, partially because we get to meet Molly before this all happens, whereas the butcher, like, kills a bunch of people, but you don’t really get any sense of personality from the guy. So in that sense, it is more Vince Vaughn’s movie, I would say. And yeah, I was I was talking to Forrest about the movie after this morning because he’s just seen it as well. And saying that remind us a lot of the Jack Black part of the Jumanji reboots were like somehow they carry off having a teenage girl in a middle aged man’s body really well. And in a way that’s like funny and kind of sweet rather than, like, only being a stereotype.

S1: Right. What do you think Vince Vaughn is sort of in relation to that?

S2: Um, I think he doesn’t succeed quite as well. I think he’s really good. But I think the fact that Jack Black is not the primary part of the Jumanji movie is maybe what makes that more successful. Just because it’s a smaller part, it doesn’t demand as much focus. Whereas this I do feel like occasionally Vince Vaughn is playing a little bit more of a stereotype of a teenage girl, mostly on the how like he changes his physicality, like when he’s running where it’s like the hands come up and it’s kind of more quote unquote, like feminine.

S1: Yeah. The run is run is a big sticking point for me. He got sort of, you know, floppy wrists like. Yeah. You know, decide when he’s running across the street. And it just feels like I mean, we’ve seen this before, like a lot in other context. That is not.

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S2: Yeah, but otherwise I do think he’s really good, like the two kind of big emotional beats. First, when Millie in the butcher’s body comes across Molly’s mother and has a heart to heart just because her mom doesn’t know who she is now. And the other scene where Molly is talking to her crush while still in the butcher’s body, both of those feel very like emotionally true and very sweet. And I think the fact that the more important moments carry off really well helps to soften the fact that, like the the some some of his other affectations are not as good.

S1: Right. I mean, this is definitely a movie. I just reading over the reviews of it. It’s one of those ones where, like, every review has the word heart in it, you know? So this is a slasher comedy, very gory, very over-the-top. But it also has heart. And, you know, as you mentioned, a lot of scenes come with Molly, particularly with her. A mother and her her sister are kind of finally reckoning with her dad’s death, with what it’s done to her and what it’s done to her family, and those are moments when the comedy, like, totally goes away. And Vince Vaughn is really just and it’s done in this case, you know, the case of the big heart to heart with with her mother through the door of this. I guess it’s a gender neutral dressing room, but it gives off like women’s dressing room vibes, like it’s all kind of pink and white. So through the dressing room door at the department store where her mom works and Vince Vaughn is you know, he’s not playing Molly. He’s just like a guy who needs help with, you know, finding a polo shirt that fits or whatever. But he starts talking about how, you know, his dad died and he had a real hard time dealing with it. But his mom, like, really kept the family together, yadda, yadda, yadda. And of course, we know that it’s really talking about her family. And the mom just kind of thinks it’s like a person with parallel experience who then she then kind of tries to hit on and go out with, which is a sublimely weird button to the scene.

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S2: Yeah, back to the future. Good. Back to the future.

S1: Yeah, I did feel like I mean, the Jack Black character in Germany is a really interesting reference point for this. And without making too much of the Jumanji movie, it’s like I do think there is like just a little sort of, you know, soupçon of like trans subtext in those movies that they’re about like kind of video game avatars and like who you are in that world and whether you’re the kid that’s there.

S2: Yeah.

S1: And, you know, the Jumanji movies, they’re not like huge intellectual level. There was some knowingness about it. And as I mentioned, there’s you know, there’s one like pronouns joke in here. But this doesn’t feel apart from them, the meatiness, which I guess is, you know, somewhat 21st century. But the the way this movie deals with gender is like, fine. But it doesn’t seem like particularly more interesting than a movie that would have made about this like 25 years ago.

S2: Elizabeth. Yeah, no, not really. I mean, I feel like the only attempt they make at, like, trying to recognize either like not binary or queer characters is just through one of my friends who is gay and like his experiences at the school, being bullied, like specifically because of that. But otherwise there’s not really too much going on, like even when Molly is the butcher, although I guess this is maybe a good point when he’s when she’s interacting with her crush. It’s the problem. Isn’t that like, oh, let’s wait till until I’m a girl again to talk about this. It’s just like let’s wait till, like, I’m back in my real body. It’s not it’s not a question of gender.

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S1: Right. And there is there is a moment where, like, she invents Vollans body and her, you know, this boy that she’s had a crush on forever, like they do kiss for a second. And I think the movie, like, I would not call it sort of like a gay panic beat. Like, it’s not like, you know, they’re not freaking out about it or I because it’s sort of it’s consensual. But they’re but then they’re like, yeah, this is like not the thing we wanted to do. Like, let’s just let’s put a pin in this, you know, for a minute. Yeah. Yeah. And you mentioned her friend Josh, and that is like one of the sort of more overt wink wink movies is when the butcher you know, I like the fact that, for example, like, they just have this police sketch of the butcher after he attacks Molly. But there’s no way to do the sort of like drawn out comedy of like he doesn’t look like look like the sketch writer. Like everybody recognizes Vince Vaughn instantly. So he can’t go anywhere because people think he’s a serial killer. So he shows up at the school and Molly’s friends are like running, running away from him. There’s this great fight in the kitchen where they’re just trying to ward him off with, like, slotted spoons and stuff, which really takes that the. The sting out of the fact that they think they’re about to be murdered, but he does say, my friend, on to say one point like to to another friend, like, oh, my God, you know, like I’m gay, you’re black. We’re going to be the first ones to die. And it’s like, yeah, I mean, the movie already killed, like four straight white kids in the opening two minutes, but, um. But yeah, but but I mean, that’s like the kind of, you know, it’s like a fine, self-conscious joke. But again, it’s like everybody we all like know that trope and the joke’s on that trope and whatever.

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S2: Yeah. I mean, I really what I like about that joke is like first, it is a funny kind of self-awareness, but also not kind of too obvious about it because there’s a lot of different kind of horror tropes that freaky goes through. But it’s never in a kind of oh, like look how smart and the referential we are about horror. It’s just in a fun way. And like just for the audience to kind of point, I’d be like, oh, like I understand that joke. It’s not like Deadpool territory.

S1: And they are. And they also like jokes kind of from, you know, not they’re not obscure references or anything, but they’re jokes, you know, from kind of just far enough inside to people on the inside like they are, you know, jokes kind of aimed at a horror audience who is there for, you know, like a horror movie, who does want the kills, you know, and you’re going to get them. You’re going to get some very kind of vicious blood. You know, there’s one point in the first scene where the butcher, like, picks up the daughter of the parents whose house they’re all drinking in. He throws a spear at her missus, kind of sticks in the wall and she she chases it around for a couple of minutes. You know, Shehhi, do you think she’s getting away? And then he comes out just like picked her up in the air, just like physically like you were here on this thing? Yeah. It reminded me very much of, like, the opening scene of Scream two, where it’s trying to kind of balance the sort of meta comedy with a really, like, horrific murders.

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S2: Yeah, I guess we can get further into the plot of it because the so at midnight, Molly and the butcher switch bodies and about halfway through the day they realize that the only way to get Milly back into her old body is to get the magic knife and then in the butchers body stab the body that she’s currently inhabiting with it. And that will put their bodies back into place. But they only have until midnight to do it, which is a crucial plot point since it’s not a lot of time to catch a serial killer.

S1: Yeah, and I think at the point they tell her, it’s like, you know, three o’clock in the afternoon and they figure it out.

S2: Yeah. She’s like, oh, we only have nine hours left. Yeah.

S1: Yeah. So that gives way to sort of sort of parallel chases. And you know, Millie, in the book you kind of chasing each other all over town on the butcher think doesn’t know he’s being pursued for a lot of that, but has like a real agenda. It’s also like homecoming weekend. So the butcher set up this thing where he’s going to learn all his classmates out to be. He’s cool now. She’s actually like if she throws a party line, people are going to come. So she says, like, there’s the party at the old mill, which turns out to be the place where, you know, she woke up in Venezuelan’s body. It’s sort of like creepy hang hangout is the serial killer bachelor pad.

S2: I guess I have to say, I was very impressed with how quickly they made it like a cool party space because it’s so creepy and gross when Molly first wakes up in there and then when they go there for the homecoming party, it’s like fully like a rave zone.

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S1: Yeah, I don’t know. It’s like I mean, I know there’s a lot of like people skilled in pop up events these days, but I’m not sure I’m super high school. So that sort of takes until you mentioned the kind of like, you know, rapee like frat boy and catter. And that’s sort of the last big thing, like gruesome setpiece here. You want to walk us through that back here?

S2: Yeah. So once they get to the homecoming party, they’re just basically at that point just trying to find the butcher to figure out what’s going on. And at that point, the butcher has kind of become part of the whole popular clique, including with all the jocks who at this point are all like, oh, like Milli’s hot. Now we all want to go out with her. But she in turn is like kind of really aggressive towards them. Like there’s one line that she says to one of the guys who’s groping her and hitting on her. It just says, I’m not going to say on the podcast, but it’s basically like you’ve never had sex appeal and you never will. And the guy takes it super personally.

S1: That’s a very like very like PG rated paraphrase of the thing she says. Yeah, yeah.

S2: But the guy takes it super personally and then calls up two of his friends. And so he lures her away from the party or he’s like, oh like you want me now don’t you. But when he gets her in a room, he brings two of his buddies. And the suggestion basically is that they’re all they’re going to gangbang her. And unfortunately for them, they don’t know that she’s a serial killer and who basically immediately takes them all out with the help of a beer bottle and a chainsaw, which is just, you know, you have hanging around for it’s an old mill. I mean.

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S1: Yes, yeah. So this is the point at which having. And, you know, part of this whole dynamic is that I’m not sure if he mentioned that he had have a sister is a police officer based on what we see, one of like maybe two or three in the entire town always seems to kind of show up everything. But she is chasing down the blissful butcher who, unbeknownst to her, has the spirit of her sister inside. And so she keeps kind of blocking Millie as she’s trying to catch up with the butcher and switch their bodies back. And so that becomes, you know, again, like the movie doesn’t make a ton of it, but there is a little bit of a, I don’t know, older sister, younger sister dynamic there, like the older sister, never believing in anything the younger sister says, not taking her seriously. You’re still like kind of brought together by their mutual grief and stuff like that. So that is another like, I don’t know, interpersonal dynamic that has to be worked out along the way.

S2: Well, the people from getting cut in half with chainsaws and yeah, I will say I thought that they would make more out of it just because Milli never totally successfully convinces her sister about what’s happened. But the way that they managed to get away from her sister is that they turn the tables on her and lock her in one of the jail cells. And as they’re leaving Millie in the butcher’s by apologizes from for some childhood events that they’ve gone through together and then leaves without saying anything else. And the fact that the butcher would somehow know about those very personal things made me think that maybe the sister would get in on it at the end or at least say something towards the end of the movie. But it just never circles back on that.

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S1: Yeah, it’s not an especially short movie. It’s about 100 minutes. So, you know, fine length, but not a sort of like, you know, lean 88 minutes or whatever. But it does feel like, I don’t know if stuff was like cut out or just, you know, lost in a draft or something. But it does feel like beats are being pointed to that and then don’t appear again. I felt could have make it like a made it like just a more coherent story. So so we have this big confrontation at the old mill. My sister comes in, shoots the butcher dead, quote unquote. And because I’ve never seen a horror movie before, I’m like, oh, well, that’s over. You really know now that they cut, then they cut to him in the ambulance and I’m like, oh, they’re just reminding us that he’s dead and still in the ambulance. Nothing will happen from now on. But no. So we find out that we see him flatlining in the ambulance. But then there’s a little cut in and you see that his usually it’s like slipped a little blood pressure cuff off his finger. We cut away. But, you know, presumably the two paramedics died. Horrible deaths after that. And, you know, this movie that has been. You know, sort of concerned more or less with this resolving these domestic issues, you know, the death of her father, the mother’s alcoholism, of course, eventually ends up back at their house, which is where the butchers track them for their final confrontation.

S2: But you glossed over the best plot point, which is that the whole reason that million the butcher are able to finally switch bodies is because of a note from her crash earlier in the film, where she comes in late for woodshop class. And Alan is like, oh, you’re always late for class. And then he crashes like, here’s a pro tip. If you set your watch five minutes early, you’ll be you’ll be on time for everything. And then when they finally stab the butcher Moelis like, oh, no, it’s midnight. It’s not time. Like, we’ve we haven’t had the deadline. I’m never going to go back to my body. But then it’s like, oh, Jake, because of your Krajcir here, what, just five minutes early?

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S1: I don’t know if this is a sign of, like, my declining mental capacity or what, but I mean, I was literally, you know, when they have that scene earlier in the movie where the guy’s like, oh, always set your watch back. You know, if I watch, I had five minutes and I’ll always be on time. And I was like, oh, that’s obviously going to come back at the end of the movie that I had completely forgotten about it at the end of the movie. Maybe that just means I’m an idiot. I mean, please. But I mean, there’s a lot going on in the movie.

S2: You’re forgiven for forgetting this thing.

S1: So so final confrontation time. I mean, one of the one of the things I like about this movie that I think is interesting about it is that, you know, it’s a body swap movie. So we learn and we we get a lot from Meely about what she learns about being in the body of this six foot five man. And it gives her, you know, confidence and she realizes she can, like, just see things and people will listen to her because she’s the six foot five white dude. There’s a lot of that like going on, which is pretty, you know, could be proper. But I think it’s like sort of a neat idea. But we get there’s no the movie has no interest in, like, who the blissful butcher is, like he has when he’s in Billy’s body, like he is some kind of badass lines and he goes and kills people. We don’t actually hear Vince Vaughn speak until I think like the last two or three minutes of the movie, like in his own in the butcher, his voice, like he doesn’t have any lines at the beginning or when he’s stalking her or anything. So he’s really not a character, which I think is like a good, good decision because we don’t really need to like both sides. Serial killing.

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S2: Yeah, no, I don’t know.

S1: Do you think that that like that sort of, you know, switcheroo is like, I don’t know, pregnant. Did you feel like that the movie did enough with that or could they have done sort of more interesting stuff with it?

S2: I agree that I feel like they could have done more with what they find, what they get out of being each other’s bodies, because one of the big things about the butcher being in his body is he doesn’t have an easier time killing people because he’s smaller and doesn’t have as much physical strength and he can’t, like, do as much. Obviously, it’s a little more interesting familicide where she’s formerly. She’d been a little bit unconfident, not sure of herself, but suddenly feels like she does have more strength, more ability to do things like she even at one point encounters one of the kids who had bullied her at school and kind of bullies him back, really, and is like, oh, like, I can do this now, like I can. And then tells him, like, if you ever mess with Millie or anybody else again, like, I’ll come get you. And he she now in this body can do that where she hasn’t really been able to before. And I, I feel like they could have dug into that a little bit more, although I don’t necessarily know how without makes maybe getting into slightly too gendered of a conversation in that respect. And also the movie is I think a perfect length as it is. I’m not sure, again, I’m just not sure like where those additional aspects would have come into play yet again.

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S1: That scene where he’s like, you know, kind of bullying the kid back is one where you really I sort of did anybody. But you don’t want to step back and be like, wait, this is like a fifty year old man, like bullying a teenage boy in a school bathroom like this is this is weird, but not like you really have to remember that that’s still a teenage girl, theoretically or something, because otherwise the the semiotics of it are just all over the place. Yeah. So what do you want to take us through? Sort of like just the last kind of the end game. And it’s like what happens in this final confrontation.

S2: Yeah. So they do kind of address what we just talked about in the final confrontation because Milly and the butcher are now fighting pitted against each other in this final big fight. And the butcher is kind of saying, like, you’re so weak in your body, like you can’t really do anything to fight back. But then in a very reboot Halloween kind of way, Milly, her sister and her mom. They are all come together to fight the butcher and managed to kill him just kind of through, I guess, familial power and familial love and strength, and the movie ends like with merely repeating a lie that had been said to her in a kind of derogatory way in the beginning, but in a way that is, I guess, sort of empowering now where she’s becoming more confident, especially like she expresses to her crush that the way that she feels in her new body where she’s like, I feel like more confident just because I’m bigger and stronger now. And he tells her that that kind of confidence and strength comes from inside, which is a nice thing to say and technically true. And it seems to be something that she is kind of realizing towards the end of the movie.

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S1: Yes. And that last line is, isn’t it?

S2: I’m a fucking piece. Yes.

S1: Some of the like. And then, you know, electric guitar really like I mean, it’s you know, I’m not sure if it actually like freeze frames, but that’s definitely like the vibe. Yeah. Just like smash cut to the credits or whatever. But yeah. Yeah, yeah. So, you know, it’s I mean, I think we’re both kind of coming down in the same place here, which is, you know, this is like a fun movie. This is technically going into movie theaters. I would not, you know, pandemic and all recommend you seeing it there. But it’s going to be on very soon.

S2: And the drive thru around here, which seems like maybe the ideal way to watch.

S1: Yeah, no, it’s definitely like a drive thru vibe. I think it’ll be fine at home. And that’s where we’re we both watched it. That is not, you know, sort of big screen spectacle that you’re going to, like, kick yourself for having missed all that. But yeah, but it’s it’s totally like fun and enjoyable. I don’t regret having seen Ellenbrook cut in half with a sore at all. My life is richer for it. Give me. Thank you, Alan Rock. Thank you. Alan Rock. We owe you a debt of gratitude.

S2: Yeah. It’s just a really fun movie and the kind of thing where I I guess I’m not sure how much it you would have to pay to watch it right now. I assume like sixteen anywhere between 16 to 20 dollars to rent it, which is I think a fine price if you’re watching it with people, if it ever hits streaming, it’s definitely something you should that’s worth checking out, especially, I guess, around Halloween. It’s nice that it is coming out on Friday the 13th.

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S1: Yes. Yeah. I mean, that had to be the case.

S4: That brings us to the end of another Spolar special. Thank you to Slate staff writer Karen Hutton. Thank you so much for having me on. Our producer is Morgan Flittering. Please subscribe to the Slate spoiler special podcast feed. And if you like the show, please read and review it in the Apple podcast store or wherever you get your podcasts. If you have suggestions for movies or TV shows we should spoil or if you have any other feedback you’d like to share, please send it to spoilers at Slate Dotcom. On behalf of Karahan and myself, thanks for listening.