S1: Alow Slate Culture Gabfest listeners, I am coming to you on a Friday. This is Julia Turner, the editor in chief of Slate. She tell you about something new? We are launching a feature in this feed called Culture Gabfest PRESENTS, where we will bring you fascinating culture content on days where we don’t give you one of our culture gabfests shows. Today we are introducing something I’m extremely excited about, a monthly show from one of our favorite culture. Get this contributor’s XML. Anthee. Hello, Chris. Hey, Julie. How are you? Good. I’m so excited for what we’re unveiling today. As a mom, please tell our listeners what they’re about to hear.

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S2: So it’s going to be a monthly podcast called Hit Parade, and it’s basically a storytelling podcast. Slightly long, not too long. Telling stories about the hits from yesteryear and bringing you up were ever possible to the present day. So we’re going to, you know, take just little stories about number one hits or maybe in the future smaller hits and talk about how they became hits, as I always say. What’s interesting about why songs become hits as part of my why is the song number one column for Slate is is it’s a mix of art and commerce. Right. It’s the song itself and it’s it’s the machinations behind the song.

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S1: So that’s what we will do with Hypocrit and a bit of the historical and cultural moment at which those songs drop. I mean, that’s one of my favorite things about your column. Exactly. I love the idea of doing your column as a podcast. Obviously it comes very fun to read it studied with video clips and fascinating references. But in the show, you can obviously just pull up the sound and you get to hear the different versions of of songs and get a little bit of a sense of the texture of the musical history that you’re talking about.

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S2: Yeah, I when I was proposing this one to Steve Lickteig, I was saying that, you know, if I have any regret. Exactly. The hangup about my my column, it’s that I densely packed my my. Why is the song number one pieces with with links? Because I feel like you need to, you know, experience a piece of the music to understand what I’m talking about. And I realize that that’s kind of disruptive sometimes. If you’re in the middle of a piece of reading. What’s great about hit parade is that when I talk about a snippet of a song, you’re just going to hear that snippet of a song. And we’ve we’ve packed the episodes with just quick little hits like 10 seconds here. Fifteen seconds there to, you know, either ring a bell, if you remember the song from your youth or to, you know, introduce you to it if you’ve never heard it before. And I think it enriches the experience.

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S1: Well, I won’t spoil the subject of the episode. Our listeners are about to hear. But I will say that I heard many versions of it that I was previously unaware of and came away at edified and with a horrible earworm in my ear. So be warned, listeners, and I guess without further ado, will launch the show.

S3: Welcome to Hit Parade. A podcast of pop chart history about the hits from coast to coast. I’m XML Champy chart analyst, pop critic and writer of Slate’s Why is this song number one series on today’s show? The story of how this improbable, infectious, insidious song.

S4: Found its way to number one.

S3: Five years after it was first recorded and two decades after it was written, it didn’t get to the top of Billboard’s iconic Hot 100 chart because of marketing savvy or musical trends or even melodic skill. It happened because of a rogue radio deejay and a bit of luck in this new podcast from Slate and the Panoply Network. We’ll dissect what makes songs popular and also what makes them great or what makes them terrible or at least memorable. We’ll tell you stories from chart history about how songs become hits the glorious intersection of art and commerce that is popular music. Our first episode is just that kind of story. It’s about a number one hit. There was originally a number 62 hit and then years later, a number 34 hit. And that was still a half decade before it topped the charts. In short, it’s a song with multiple lives, and thanks to that enterprising radio programmer, this hit accidentally kicked off a two year fad on America’s airwaves. Whatever you think of this song as an intoxicating party jam, as an easy listener that wafts through your workday or as a totally obnoxious earworm, what’s undeniable is it has endured from the late 60s to the late 80s. And that’s where your hit parade marches today. The week ending October 15th, 1988, when the song Red Red Wine by Eubie 40 hit number one.

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S5: It’s one of roughly a dozen songs that have topped the Billboard Hot 100 over the last half century. That sport a reggae rhythm excuse me, written as catchy as it is. Eubie 40s red red wine doesn’t so much bounce as lilt.

S4: I meant what I said a moment ago when I described it as a song that wafts in red.

S6: Red Wine is a true trans-Atlantic hit.

S3: It was you before his first number one, both in America and in England, their home country except in their native UK. Red red wine went to number one in September 1983. Here in America, it didn’t ring the bell until a half decade later. How’d that happen? And how did a bi racial reggae pop group from Birmingham, England, come to record this Brill Building soft rock song as a reggae tune in the first place? For that, we’ll have to put a pin in 1988 and another one in 1983 and go all the way back to the 1960s. That’s when Red Red Wine was written and first recorded by an up and coming singer songwriter from Brooklyn, New York. Perhaps you’ve heard of this gentleman who still records and tours very successfully today.

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S5: That, friends, is Neild Rock n Roll Hall of Famer Blue Jean Baad, a man who loves a hot August night and once improbably called himself the jazz singer.

S3: But all that was still in his future in 1967 when he wrote and recorded Just for You, the album containing Red Red Wine and Only Diamonds, second album as a recording artist. Mind you, I don’t want to understate diamond stature in the mid to late 60s. He was on quite a roll, having already toted up top 10 hits under his own name and chart toppers as a songwriter for others. I briefly mentioned the Brill Building earlier. That’s the actual landmarked building in midtown Manhattan that in the 50s and 60s, double-D is quite literally a song factory. Songwriters often in pairs, sitting in a small room with an upright piano, crafting some of the greatest songs of the first wave of rock and roll. The name Brill Building came to stand in for an entire era of polished professional songwriter pop. Neil Diamond broke through as a writer at the Brill Building. But unlike his fellow Brooklynite and Brill Building writer Carole King, Diamond didn’t wait until the 70s to try and break through as a frontline artist. He was already finding success, both writing and performing on huge mid-60’s hits.

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S7: He scored his first top 10 as an artist in 1966 with Cherry Cherry.

S5: And by 1967, Diamond had scored his first number one, not as an artist but as a songwriter.

S7: Again, what distinguished diamond from his songwriter Pro Peers was often the hits he penned for others were songs he meant for himself or even recorded himself. That was definitely the case with I’m a Believer. A song Diamond recorded himself first before bequeathing it to the Monkees, a TV spawned pop band that took it all the way to the top.

S8: Then I saw her.

S7: So where did red red wine fit into Neil’s first wave of singing and writing success?

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S3: Honestly, it was a dud and it arguably even broke his stride. We now think of Diamond as a purveyor of chest thumping singalong anthems like Sweet Caroline or America. But in the 60s, he had a proclivity for a certain kind of acoustic balladry, moody, folky, wine, dark. See what I did there?

S7: For example, you can hear Diamond in this ruminative mode on his 1966 breakthrough Single Solitary.

S9: And you can hear brooding Neil again on his 1967 single girl. You’ll be a woman soon.

S10: You’ll be all.

S7: Girl, you’ll be a woman singer was a number 10 hit in the spring of 67, but it would be Diamond’s last top 10 for more than two years after scoring six straight Top 40 hits back to back to back in 1966 and 67.

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S3: Diamond fell off with his next pair of singles, New Orleans and Red Red Wine, both of which missed the Top 40. In fact, a half dozen diamond singles missed the Top 40 in 1968 and 1969. Red Red Wine was among the worst performers in this period, peaking on the hot 100 at number 62 in the spring of 1968. In just a three week chart run.

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S7: Let’s listen briefly to Diamond’s version of his song again.

S11: And you can hear where our buddy Neal went.

S7: The problem, I think, was the diamonds, red, red wine was neither fish or fowl. In one sense, it’s solitary man part to a morose, regretful saloon ballad about a man looking to drink away the memory of the woman who left him.

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S9: But it doesn’t have the stately grace of solitary man or the brooding majesty of girl. You’ll be a woman soon. And that’s because, on the other hand, Diamond’s version is just a little overproduced. The strings, the gently plucked guitar. This wants to be a slow dance number, but who wants to slow dance to a regretful ballad about trying to forget someone who’s left you? So that should have been the end of the story of red red wine. This very short lived hit would have been a footnote in the history of Neil Diamond, who, by the way, righted the ship by the summer of 69 with his top five smash. Sweet Caroline. I won’t play that delightful brain fungus on this podcast. You can go and find your favorite Boston Red Sox fan and have it bellow it at you if you must. Anyway, by the 1970s, Diamond emerged as a perennial Hot 100 chart topper, and he became, according to Billboard chart historian Joel Whitburn, one of the decade’s 10 biggest hit makers. But we can’t leave the 60s yet because that same year, 1969, saw another version of Red Red Wine recorded and released. And this version was considerably less dower.

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S6: That’s Tony Tri, a Jamaican singer of the very influential subgenre known as Rocksteady. The predominant Jamaican music of the mid to late 1960s. Rock Steady was a bridge between the early 60s, more frenetic uptempo genre SCAA and the smokier groovy or more WOAK and ultimately more durable genre reggae, as its name suggests. Rock Steady has a steady pulse, but it still rocks, albeit gently.

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S5: A radio programmer might call the genre mid-tempo if you’re familiar with The Paragons 1966 song. The Tide is High, which was made globally famous in 1980 in a cover by the American band Blondie.

S7: You’re familiar with the mid-tempo groove of rock steady.

S6: And speaking of covers, back to turn truck reggae in all its permutations is famous for cars. Indeed, the whole genre is built on Jamaican sound systems, sharing and reimagining beats and songs. When a Jamaican artist covers an Anglo pop song, he often reconfigures the very structure of the song from the ground up. And that’s what Tony Tribe does with red red wine. His version is utterly transformed.

S7: Tribe retains the fundamental sadness of Neil Diamond song, but brings it tempo just enough to give it a lilt.

S9: It’s not a slow dance record anymore. Now it’s a drinking your cares away record like Rock Steady Itself, which is a bridge genre. Tony Tribe’s version of Red Red One is a bridge between Neil Diamond’s flop and the song’s Second Life. Tribe’s rendition wasn’t just a hit in Jamaica. It was a minor chart. Success in England peaking in the U.K. at number 46 in 1969. And that UK chart peak is important because this is the version of red red wine that the members of Eubie 40 heard as kids growing up in the multi-cultural British city of Birmingham. In Fred Bronson’s classic chart history reference, the Billboard Book of number one hits you before guitarist Robin Campbell claims, quote, We had no idea Neil Diamond had anything to do with it. The only version we were aware of was the Tony TRYED version. You’ll be 40. Formed in late 1978, a little less than a decade after Tony tribes’ hit single. This group of eight members half white, half black came together in a Birmingham awash in SCAA rock, steady and reggae, thanks to the city’s tens of thousands of Jamaican diaspora and descendants. They named their group after the government paperwork you filled out when living on the dole unemployment benefit form 40 Eubie 40 got their break when Chrissie Hind saw them playing in a pub and gave them a slot as an opener for her band, The Pretenders. They broke fairly quickly.

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S5: Eubie, 40, were lucky enough to catch a wave as it crested at a time when England was mad for the sound of Two-Tone SCAA and other blends of new wave and reggae blends like the special’s cover of the 60s Rocksteady Classic. A Message to You, Rudy. A top 10 UK hit in 1970, Eubie, 40, picked up the ball just as Two-Tone bands like The Specials were tailing off by the end of 1980.

S12: They had already scored three straight top 10 singles on the British charts, leading with their number four singles, Food for Thought A Diatribe against World Hunger.

S13: Man.

S5: Like food for thought. Most of you before these early hits were originals, although even in that first wave they were scoring with an occasional remake, notably their B-side hit. I think it’s going to rain today, a cover of a classic Randy Newman song and.

S14: In all, Eubie, 40, spun off eight straight UK Top 40 singles in their first three years and all but the Randy Newman cover were originals.

S5: But by 1982, the hits in the UK were getting smaller and in early 83, one single missed the British Top 40 entirely. It was time for a reboot and the band promptly did so with their 1983 album Labour of Love.

S12: Labor of Love, as its title suggests, was an affectionate Amar’s to Eubie Forty’s influences. The album consists entirely of covers 10 songs. The group grew up with all of them by reggae artists like Jimmy Cliff, The Wailers Boy Friday and Winston Groovy.

S5: As I noted earlier, as far as the band was concerned, Red Red Wine, the album’s lead single, was a reggae cover, too. They modeled their version not on the Neil Diamond original, which was utterly unknown to them, but on the Toni Tribe version. But where Tribe had picked up the tempo from Diamond Eubie, 40, slowed it back down about half a step, turning it from rock steady into a kind of swaying lover’s rock. Probably the most original addition the group made to the song was in its bridge when group member Terrance Wilson, a.k.a. Astro, did some toasting the traditional Afro-Caribbean form of rap that in the 60s was the Jamaican precursor to what became hip hop. This was fairly notable for a hit single in the early 80s at a time when the Rap Bridge was just starting to appear on Anglo pop records like Blondie’s Rapture. Eubie 40’s version of Red Red Wine devoted a sizable chunk of its running time to Astro toasting over a beet red red wine limitlessly.

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S15: So you keep me rockin all of the time. Red red wine limitlessly.

S12: So when you just read it in the UK. Red red wine was an instant smash. Returning Eubie 40 not only to the top 10, but giving them their first number one in the fall of 83. And by the winter of 1984, it even broke them in America. To this point, the group hadn’t made the U.S. charts at all.

S5: Not even the lower rungs of the hot 100. And by the way, that’s not surprising. Americans have a spotty history with reggae in England. Reggae has been a regular part of the pop stew since the 60s. Songs with all manner of Jamaica derived beats hit the UK charts routinely. In the U.S., we tend to treat reggae like a Tremblant or a fad. Small flurries of reggae and dancehall tracks will hit our charts in waves, then recede in the early 70s, for example. We saw a small boom of light reggae singles topping our Hot 100 like Johnny Nash’s classic. I can see clearly now, or Eric Clapton’s cover of Bob Marley’s I shot the sheriff. But then reggae more or less receded on the U.S. pop charts during the late 70s disco years. The early 80s was another small boom time for the Jamaican sound on the U.S. charts. Whether it was adapted by British new romantic acts like culture clubs.

S16: Or turned into reggae funk hybrids like Guyana’s Eddie or just another to straight up traditional reggae like Birmingham’s musical youth Dutchie.

S17: Anxiety. All of these songs were top 10 American hits in 1983, so it wasn’t entirely surprising when in January 1984, Eubie 40s Red Red Wine debuted on the Hot 100.

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S18: Two months later, it broke into the Top 40 and got not much further peaking at number 34 for the week ending March thirty first nineteen eighty for America.

S19: I’m Casey Kasem. Here’s the eight man reggae band with a recent number one song in Great Britain. It’s Eubie 40. They climb to not just a 34 with red red wine.

S18: Still, this is a perfectly respectable U.S. showing for a reggae pop band. In 1984, American pop fans don’t listen to much reggae to begin with. One year later, you’ll be 40. Even managed to capitalize on this U.S. success with another cover. In 1985, they recorded a remake of the Sonny and Cher classic. I Got You, Babe.

S17: With their mentor, Chrissie Hynde of The Pretenders in the U.K., this cover became Eubie 40 second number one hit in the summer of eighty five in America. That same summer I got you, babe reached number 28 on the hot 100.

S20: A little better even than red red wine had done the year before, babe.

S5: Again, not setting the colonies on fire, but respectable. Quietly you before you began selling albums here. Slowly but steadily.

S18: By the summer of 1986, three years after its release, the Labor of Love album, which never got higher on the Billboard album chart, the number 39 finally went gold in America, signifying a half million in U.S. sales. So heading into the late 80s, this modest profile looked like the best you beforethey would do in the United States in their native UK. The band kept scoring top 10 and top 20 hits. But on this side of the Atlantic, a couple more albums went by with not much to show for it. Eubie 40s, U.S. Label and M Records kept trying to break the band here, continuing to release singles and promoting them to American radio programmers. The men who picked the hits their stations will play. And that’s when everything changed for Eubie 40, thanks entirely to one of those programmers. In 1988, A&M was trying again at U.S. Radio with yet another Eubie 40 single. This time the song was called Breakfast in Bed in the U.K. Where You Be were now radio staples. Breakfast in bed reached number six, perfectly normal for them. It was yet another cover. By now, Eubie, 40, had established their formula. This time they were remaking an old Dusty Springfield single from 1968.

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S7: And once again, they teamed up with their old pal, Chrissy Hines.

S17: Doesn’t sound like much of a smash, does it? It certainly didn’t.

S18: In the summer of 1988, two guys, a Polian legend in the radio business, who’s worked for numerous stations over the years and back then was the program director for KCC F.M. in Phoenix, Arizona, to observe Polian staffers in Phoenix had been serviced the breakfast in bed single by A&M Records playing it led them to dig back in their archives to re familiarize themselves with you before his catalog.

S12: Listening to red red wine again for the first time in four years, WSA Polian and his associates, the apocryphal story goes, said to themselves. See, now that’s a hint.

S21: To quote, one of the things I’ve always used throughout my career as a poli into told Fred Bronson a billboard record number one is what I call would have been should have beens if the current music wasn’t up to snuff. I would dig into a pile of songs that I thought should have been a hit.

S12: Zeppelin, as it happened in 1988, had a fairly low risk way to test out old records he thought missed their mark the first time he programmed a Saturday night dance show on Kaseasbeh called Party Patrol. So just for kicks, he threw red red wine into the rotation on party patrol and the requests.

S18: Bronson reports came in hot and heavy. WSA Polian moved red red wine into KCC peas, regular rotation, ignoring Eubie 40s current single entirely. It’s hard to say what had changed since 1983 that suddenly made red red wines sound like a smash to Phoenix listeners that hot summer of 88. By the late 80s, New Wave and reggae had largely fallen out of favor at Top 40 radio. The charts by then were dominated by what I call D-VA Pop of the Whitney Houston and Madonna.

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S7: And here, another ranging from Bon Jovi to Def Leppard. On the other hand, the late 80s also saw the rise of harder R&B music like New Jack Swing, along with some of rap’s first pop crossover hits.

S12: These movements had given pop radio a taste for the hip hop sound. Astros toasting on the bridge of red red wine suddenly must have seemed rather prescient.

S22: And on the schlocky or side of the dial in 1988, that summer’s hot movie was Tom Cruise’s cocktail, which by the fall had spawned two number one hits, both vaguely, very vaguely Island flavored The Beach Boys, Hokey cocomo and Bobby McFerrin’s Goofy.

S23: Don’t Worry, Be Happy is a little song I wrote. You might want to sing it note for note or be happy.

S24: Americans might not have been too interested in reggae persay in 1988, but if it sounded like an adult beverage with an umbrella sticking out of it, they were all in two decades earlier.

S18: Tony Tribe had turned Neil Diamond sad drinking song into a fun drinking song, and Eubie, 40, were the ultimate beneficiary of that reinvention. David Jefferies, a critic for the music website. All music later wrote that, quote, Omnipresence has turned Eubie 40s red red wine into pop. Reggae’s. Don’t worry, be happy, unquote. I would say that’s exactly right. Anyway, in the summer of 88, WSA Polian reached out to Adam Records, telling them about the dozens of requests on his station for red red wine and urging them to consider rereleasing the nearly five year old hit. At first, Adam balked. For one thing, they had a current Eubie 40 album and single to promote. For another thing, this is not how the industry is supposed to work. Labels offer their priority singles to radio programmers who can then choose to play or not play the current hit as per their regional needs. They’re not supposed to go off the reservation and revive a track from a five year old album. The label isn’t actively working right now. But Zeppelin was already all in. And as word of KCC, a.p.’s success with red red wine started to spread, the song essentially went viral. One by one other pop stations added the old Eubie 40 song to their playlists, essentially killing the momentum of the current Eubie 40 single, in fact. Breakfast in bed never even made the hot 100 at all. By late summer, A&M switched its promotional focus from Eubie 40s current record to red red wine. Luckily, the band hadn’t changed American labels in all that time and and probably figured they’d make money either way, even if the new record was a dud. The label pressed new cassettes of the red red one single, by the way. A funny aside, in 1983 and 84, the so-called CCA’s single hadn’t been invented yet. Red Red Wine was only issued on 45 p.m. vinyl. So this 1988 rerelease was the first time the red red wine single could be bought on tape. Likewise, newly pressed copies of the Labor of Love album on c.D and cassette made their way to the nation’s Sam Goody’s and Strawberries on the Hot 100 dated August 13th, 1988. Red Red Wine debuted at number eighty five, actually, because the record was coming back after a four and a half year gap. Billboard properly listed the song as a reentry now in its 16th week on the chart. Three weeks later, red red wine was back in the Top 40. A week after that, it leapt to number 28. Eubie 40s. Biggest hit since I got you, babe in 1985. And higher than red red wine had gone the first time it hurtled into the top five. Less than a month later, and finally, nine weeks after it re-entered the hot 100. The song Guiseppe Polian and his staff in Phoenix, plucked from a pile of old records, was the number one song in America for the week, ending October 15th, 1988. Around the same time, Labor of Love, the 1983 album, reached a new 1988 peak of number eight on the Billboard album chart and ultimately went platinum in total.

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S5: Eubie 40s Red Red Wine spent a dozen weeks in the Top 40 during its second run. And here’s where things get interesting. The week in late November 1988, when the song slipped out of the Top 40, there was another reentry toward the bottom of the Hot 100.

S25: Coming in at number eighty four was a ballad called When I’m With You by the Canadian band Sheron. What exactly does this gooey power now have to do with for Breezy Island Jam? Nothing at all. Musical but Eubie Be 40 and guys actually had started a small fan.

S5: Radio programmers were now raiding their vaults for old records they thought deserved a second chance to become hits when I’m With You.

S9: sheriffs’ one and only hit had peaked at number 61 back in 1983. In late 1988, inspired by red red wine, Minneapolis radio programmer Brian Phillips plucked the power ballad from his library and put it into rotation. And it too went viral. Capitol Records sheriffs’ label played along, reissuing the single in the fall of 88, but the label brass were a little annoyed. Unlike you beforethey a band that at least still existed. Sheriff, the band behind When I’m With You had broken up four years before the single climbed the hot 100 rapidly, but capital was in essence promoting a mirage. Quote, We should be looking forwards rather than backwards capitals. Vice President of Promotion told the L.A. Times. There are so many great records out there that deserve exposure that it’s kind of a waste of time to expose these old records. You don’t have anything to build. There’s no future in it. However, Capitals Promotions Department felt by February of 1989 sheriffs’ when I’m with you had repeated you before’s feet and reached number one on the hot 100. The programmer mutiny was on Guiseppe Polling’s would have been should have been. Experiment had become a phenomenon by the middle of 1989, with programmers digging through their vaults and fans phoning in radio stations to request old songs they’d thought deserved another shot. The Hot 100 was suddenly awash in 3 5 and even 9 year old singles these included.

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S5: Where Are You Now? A ballad by the Pennsylvania band Synch, which stalled at number 77 in 1986, but made it all the way to number 10 in its 1989 run.

S12: And the song, whose second one turned it into a radio staple, an impassioned 1980 Ode to Jailbait by Benny Maradona’s. Into the Night. Not every rereleased single did better the second time into the night, for example, was a number 11 hit in 1980, but only made it as high as number 20 in 1989.

S21: The same went for Peter Gabriel’s In Your Eyes, which in its first release in 1986 as the follow up to the number one Smash Sledgehammer, had only gotten as high on the chart as number 26. Given a second release in the summer of 89 after its appearance in the Cameron Crowe movie, Say Anything in Your Eyes didn’t know better. It just missed the Top 40 peaking at number forty one. But these lower second run chart peaks for into the night and in your eyes didn’t much matter. In both cases, just having a second run improve the song’s long term fortunes.

S5: Flip on easy listening or adult contemporary radio today and in your eyes as the Peter Gabriel song your likeliest to hear. You’re also far likelier to hear Benny Mardon as into the night than you would have been prior to 1989. Just charting a second time.

S18: Put these songs into permanent oldies rotation. The would have been should have been F&D didn’t last long. In typical fashion, the music industry tried to co-opt the fat, actually sending bands back into the studio to rerecord their old hits to make them more current sounding. In some cases this worked. Real lifes Send Me an Angel was actually a note for note rerecording of the 1983 original with slightly updated synthesizers, and six years later it reached number 26.

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S7: Three notches higher than it did the first time. But by 1990, when early 80s synth Popper’s Modern English tried to rerecord their new wave classic I Melt With You with more modern percussion.

S18: The fad was spent. I melt with you was truly a would have been should have been in its 1983 chart run. It peaked at number 78.

S12: Surprisingly low considering how immortal that MTV classic is today.

S7: And the 1990 re-recording peaked at number 76, two notches higher, sure, but no top 40 immortality for all that effort.

S5: The problem with the fad as that grumpy capital records exac noted, was that few of the @s careers benefited much from the sudden burst of attention. Polygram Records had lost touch with Benny Maradona’s and needed to hunt him down just to send him royalty checks. Cinches lead singer Jimmy Harmon had already gone on to a solo career, which went nowhere and was over by 1991. Sheriff again had been defunct for years. Cleverly, the band’s lead singer and guitarist quickly formed a new group, Alias, and recorded another power ballad. More than Words Can Say.

S7: That sounded like When I’m With You, part two. It reached number two in 1980.

S5: But the act that benefited most from the would have been should have been F&D was the band that started it all in 1988, Eubie 40. They had already spent the middle of the 1980s becoming in essence a reggae pop covers band to only middling success. But after red red wine, they went for the jugular and hit the jackpot. They came back in late 1989 with the album Labour of Love, too, of course. And this time, rather than remaking hardcore reggae deep cuts, the remakes were of big, unmistakable pop classics of yesteryear. The album spun off its first big hit in 1990.

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S17: Eubie, 40, returned to the U.S. Top 10 with their cover of The Temptations. The way you do the things you do. I’m number hit.

S26: Two things from the same album.

S17: They did even better with their take on Al Green’s. Here I am. Come and take me a number six hit in early nineteen ninety one. And two years after that, Eubie, 40, had the biggest hit of their career when their cover of Elvis Presley’s Can’t Help Falling in love.

S25: Spent seven weeks on top of the Hot 100.

S7: It was the third biggest hit of 1993 after. I will always love you and want. There it is. By the way, in all three cases, these covers by U.V. 40 charted higher on the Hot 100 than the Temptations Al Green’s and even Elvis’s original singles did come to think of it.

S5: So did Red Red Wine, the dud 1968 Neil Diamond single that took three tries to top the charts. One tried by Diamond and two tries by Eubie 40. So what does Neil Diamond think of his transformed single? It’s pretty clear he’s charmed by it. Financially, it’s all upside for him. His songwriting royalties for what originally was a minor single must be welcome, but more important. Even Neil regards his song as a transformed work now.

S7: Often when Diamond performs it live, it’s got the rock steady tempo of Tony Tribe and you’ll be 40. And Neil even takes the toast style rap break of Eubie 40s Astro out for a spin. Feel so even if the words are. I hope you enjoyed this debut episode of Hit Parade. My producer and the executive producer of Slate podcasts is Steve Lickteig. Panel, please. Chief content officer is Andy Bowers. Check out their entire roster of podcasts at Panoply. Got f.m. Thanks for listening. And I look forward to leading the hit parade. Back your way. Until then, keep on marching on the one. I’m Chris Malang.