Julián Is Through-lian

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S1: The following recording may contain explicit language I can’t get more explicit than May with literal say it may.

S2: It’s Thursday, January 2nd, 2019 from Slate, it’s the gist. I’m Mike PESCA. Over the last few days, I was away in Louisiana and the news there was dominated by a story from one state over Texas, but also from my home state, New York. In Texas. Guttmann Stupid Newsworld. Zorin Centaurs or Nahh Walls. They are men who choose to grab guns and hurt other people with them.

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S3: But anyway, a gunman, as they say, killed two churchgoers before being felled by an arms instructor who was packing heat. What a triumph for Texas is new laws that allow concealed carry in church.

S1: Meanwhile, in Muncie, New York, a machete wielding mad man attacked a gathering at a rabbi’s home for Hanukkah. The people there had no guns. Neither did he. And therefore, they had to wait until justice was served. Police tracked the suspect down and arrested him. Remarkable to me was how credulous the coverage was of the wisdom of Texas, his gun laws. This from ABC News.

S4: This shooting only lasted a few seconds before a security guard and several armed citizens quickly intervened with.

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S5: Right. In fact, one man who said he had a relative inside the church at the time, he said he is thankful for so many good guys with guns.

S1: ABC at least quoting a citizen there. Fox News was simply putting the NRA is talking points into the mouth of an anchor.

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S6: But first, a good guy with a gun is being praised for preventing a massacre in Texas. The hero stabbing a gunman just seconds after he opened fire in a church, killing two people. Local officials in the past are saying the man saved countless lives.

S7: We can’t prevent every incident. We can’t prevent mental illness from from occurring, and we can’t prevent every crazy person from Hulk pulling a gun. This church is a models for preparation.

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S1: That last voice there was Ken Paxton, attorney general for Texas. Left unsaid in that framing is that monsey, New York, good guys with a folding table and chairs chased off a bad guy with a machete. No one was reaching for the good guys with a gun. Stopping bad guys without a gun being the preferable scenario for a vicious attack on worshippers. Even the clergy involved in these two attacks had different stances. Here is the pastor from the church in Texas who lost two great men today.

S8: But it could have been a lot worse. And I’m thankful that our government has allowed us the opportunity to protect ourselves.

S9: Getting a lot less widespread attention was the rabbi for months in New York, probably because he spoke mainly in Yiddish. But he didn’t repeat his main message in English. In this interview could have been much worse had someone had it.

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S3: I’m, of course, grateful that a highly trained gun instructor was on the scene in Texas to prevent more people from getting shot. But the analogy that came to my mind was something like a society going overboard to praise the heroic efforts of a field medic who saved someone whose appendix burst as opposed to the society providing sufficient medical care to catch the appendix before it bursts. Or maybe something like if a lion escapes from a zoo. Sure. Kudos to the game warden who subdues the lion. But we should prefer to live in a society where the zoos are secured. Or maybe. Here’s a thought. No lions in zoos at all. There are cultural differences between New York, where guns are seen as sources of violence, death in Texas, where guns are seen as deliverers of violence and death that could possibly save you from other guns which might deliver worse violence and more death. And that’s, of course, if everything works perfectly well, the kind of perfectly where some people have already been shot with guns. Perhaps I’m speaking from a cultural perspective. I am a New Yorker. I am not a Texan. Of course, New York had 772 gun fatalities in twenty seventeen. Texas had three thousand five hundred thirteen. Texas does have 50 percent higher population. But it also does have a gun fatality rate of 350 percent of New York’s. But those are statistics and empirical evidence. And I know how we think. The only thing that stops a good guy with evidence is a bad guy with slogans on the show today from Hood to Dud. The candidacy of Julian Castro, he had some powerful moments on the campaign trail, just not enough to actually appeal to actual voters. But first, in our last show before Christmas, we brought you the podcasters from Zero Blog 30. I spent some extra time with Chaps and Kate talking about chaps, his role in the military dog handler. We’re here to talk about that now.

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S1: Kate Manyon, an Uncle, Chaps, or Matthew Katherine, are the hosts of these Zero Blog Thirty podcast, where they discuss important issues to veterans and important issues to anyone interested in eavesdropping on veterans. Both served in the Marines where Kate was a corporal and chaps was a Purple Heart recipient. He’s a retired gunnery sergeant and a dog handler. And so that’s where we went straight to the dogs. And tell me about the dogs being a dog trainer.

S10: Yeah, it’s the best job in the Marine Corps. I loved it, so I didn’t even know it was an option when I joined to be a dog handler and I graduated top of my class at MPE school and they said, you want to be a dog handler. And I was like, well, what do we do?

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S9: How long’s M.P. school? Eight weeks. Think so? How does one do that? You do basic, first basic.

S10: And then you go to Marine combat training. Right. Just about three weeks and then you go on to in Peace Corps, whatever your follow on that is to do. Right. And then canine school is 12 weeks. Wow. And did you have dogs growing up? Yeah, I did. But I never taught them anything. And now I did it for almost a decade as a dog handler. And now my dog Gus is a massive ridgeback and he doesn’t know the first trick or command.

S11: The only thing they know is civilian knows.

S10: Lay down on your pillow and he knows backup and he knows you want to go outside when you work with service dogs like that.

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S3: Is it a different relationship than a pet dog? How similar and how different?

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S12: Yeah, it is very different because you establish a relationship. So you build that almost like a pet relationship for the dog. You feed the dog, you give the dog water so they know that good things come from you. And one of the biggest miscalculations of being a dog handler is that the dog outranks you. I don’t know if you’ve heard. I don’t know that. Yeah, the dog is considered an officer or something military. It makes no sense because I tell the dog what to do, not the other way around. I say, you go smell that and go smell it. Now, it doesn’t be like I’m going to go check out what I want to you hang back here, devil dog. I’m going to go see. But do the dogs have a rank? No, no, no. They’ll be what would that mean? Classified as equipment like. So whenever you see a dog get an award like whenever al-Baghdadi was killed. Yeah. And they brought the thing. Yeah. Male or female. Female lady from Alaska. So they brought in the lady dog and they wanted to give her an award that’s just for show. Like they don’t get awards like it’s giving like having an award there. Yeah.

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S13: I let it go down your chairs. Like whenever we think of military equipment he always comes back to do a big chair guy.

S11: We got to go to Lackland to the dog handling store for a video and I got to put on the full byt suit and then chaps. It was like riding a bike for him. He put the sleeve on again and this dog is spit flying everywhere. And like I couldn’t look I had to look away and it was like ten years hadn’t passed. He just caught the dog, knew exactly what to do. And to me, it’s so impressive to be able to do that stuff.

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S9: Physical to watch it more is the dog used, what, 90 percent for bomb sniffing?

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S10: Yeah. It’s if a dog’s deployed it’s going to be for. I mean you will have I mean how difficult is it to be like locate a poppy field.

S11: You don’t need a guide dog, right. Right. You don’t need a dog. Toto did that. Oh, very sleepy, Jan..

S10: But if you’re in the airport, I mean, it’s gonna be 90 percent.

S3: Yeah, explosives. I do. They usually use German Shepherds or what breeds German shepherds.

S10: Belgian Malinois was I love a Belgian Malinois while I smell great.

S1: That’s what CONOMOS is. And did they change a rule about some of those dogs after their service is done being used as pets allowed to be adopted?

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S10: Yeah. And I was actually involved in writing sometimes. So whenever a lot of the dogs came back, many of them weren’t adoptable. Because they used to be a lot more dogs were called dual purpose. So in a like a civilian world, a dual purpose dog can both find explosives and they’re attack dogs. So getting a dog into a family who’s also trained to attack is not the best idea. It’s not the best in the world. But since we’ve been doing so much Afghanistan and Iraq and it’s a lot more explosive. One of the things that’s fallen to the wayside is a lot of the dogs don’t have the ability to do the attack work because they want them to be around platoons of troops and things like that so they can be a little bit nicer. So a lot more dogs are getting adopted out now. Dogs are just like anything else, any other piece of equipment. You don’t look at an informed be like what? We’ve used it for three or four years. We need to get a new one. They use these dogs until they’re almost done, until they’re about to die. And then it’s time for them to go. Because if you do take the dog in, you’re responsible for all those vet care. No one wants to adopt a dog that’s ten years old, has done multiple deployments. That is going to bite probably a child. And then they have hip dysplasia. They have heart issues. They probably have cancer because they’ve been around burn pits and stuff just like the troops have. They have a little. But we did admit it with the dogs.

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S11: Right. That’s cross the canyon off of rifle. That’s not true. That’s a very impressive dogs.

S10: But some of the dogs do are able to get adopted. And now you have kennel masters who can perform the test of that. Like, look at the dog. The dog’s disposition. Say, OK. This dog is good to go. It can be it. So what went into writing that legislation or writing those rules? Well, one of my friends, his name is Christie as he was killed in Afghanistan and his dog was two at the time, two and a half. And his parents wanted to adopt the dog. The military still wants to use that dog because they have 40, 50 thousand dollars invested into the dog. So we had to look at which is easier, like what’s the right thing to do here? And the government eventually decided that if we can’t adopt it out, it doesn’t put us in a bad position like our T-O objective, then we can adopt these dogs out. And it was just talking to people to get that commonsense decision made. If the dog needs to deploy again to Afghanistan, obviously the dog’s staying in the unit. If you can have another dog and replace it before it becomes a problem for the unit. Let’s try to give the family the dog.

S3: And this would mostly be for people who’ve worked with dogs, dog handlers.

S10: Right. So any dog that gets like my dog Sika, he got cancer as well. The dog that I was with when I was deployed, the very first phone call that they made was to me like, do you want to adopt him? Mm hmm. I decided no, that I didn’t because I didn’t want this dog that I had talked about so much to come in and form a relationship with my kids. Then I know this dog that saved my life died. And it’s the family pet at the same time. Yeah. I was just like, I’m not ready for that emotional comment.

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S1: Yeah, I would hope that some people wouldn’t feel guilty and say yes when they should make the decision.

S11: Yeah. You got to make that decision sometimes. I think they know, too, there’s so many people who want to adopt these dogs that, you know, chap said this isn’t for me right now, but there’s pipeline of people who. Yeah, I got his very next handler. Right.

S1: Mm hmm. Oh. So we’ll. CONAN, is kohnen going back in service? Do you know she’s already back in service? Yeah. Do you think all the attention to and not the controversy. It’s a male female, but all the attention and the outpouring and even for the first time, our president accurately describing how a dog works because he often has that problem of thinking they get fired or whatever. Right.

S14: Just like a dog. That’s right. Do you think that’s a good and hopeful and heartening thing, or is that I would have a go ahead. I don’t want interrupt. I wish it would’ve went to that attention when I went to a male dog, honestly, because. And it makes sense in a second, because every lady dog in a kennel gets an enormous amount of attention because every dog handler calls a momma’s.

S10: And immediately it’s probably 80, 20 percent of female versus male more male. OK, then females.

S14: So every time you walk by, hey, momma, what do you do, girl?

S12: And then they all put their backs against the cage and get pat and the dog and there’s lover. So she’s out there getting the normal attention when it’s probably Ricky Ricardo, the dog that needs to get a little bit more attention because he’s feeling bad about himself, cause you’re caught. Why do you. Ricky Ricardo? Just another TV famous. I actually had a dog named Ricky in Okinawa. And we would do the Ricky Ricardo voice. Yeah, I do. Ricky Ricardo jokes when I’m not talking about chairs.

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S13: I say those here. Those are his two big things. He’s got that famous 50s first half hour comedy special with that chairs and Eddie Murphy, famous dog, you Mirtha, Ricky Ricardo, arguably Cape Manyon and Uncle Chaps are the hosts of Zero Blog Thirty on the Barstool Podcast Network. A great insight. And whatever that your version is insight into how the military, former military thinks about the military and the world. Thank you, guys. Thank you.

S3: And now the schpiel hooligan is. Threw me in the presidential campaign of Julian Castro, came to an end today when the former HUD secretary and mayor of San Antonio announced that it was no longer plausible to mount a presidential campaign, what with his low polling numbers and poor fundraising. As with every candidate who has ever bowed out, the fault was laid at the feet of the system. Castro took out ads in Iowa, blaming Iowa for being the first to vote, surprisingly, this did not provide the rocket ship like acceleration in the Des Moines Register poll that his campaign sorely needed. He criticized the DNC for excluding candidates like him or specifically him for the debate stage. This from an interview with David gir- on MSNBC.

S15: You have these thresholds in place and then folks either make the debate or they don’t. If you don’t make the debate, then MSNBC, CNN, all of the other media out there are a little less likely to actually give you airtime because they’re responding to the polls. And so it’s this media and political echo system that starts winnowing down the field.

S9: There is a problem with this critique of the DNC, which, by the way, is headed by Tom Perez, who is aided mightily in getting that position by whacking Castro, Houlihan’s brother. But the problem is that the winnowing of the field isn’t a bug. It is the feature. The remit of the DNC is to set up debates and forums to narrow the field down. If the criticism of the DNC is that they narrowed the field down, well, that’s like criticizing figure skating judges for being too judgmental. Now, if you want to say that the problem with the DNC isn’t that they winnowed, but how they winnowed. Well, that would be something. But it is not that easy a case to make. It’s tempting to make the case, but it doesn’t hold up to much scrutiny. I mean, it’s tempting psychologically for the supporters or the actual person of Julian Castro. Some candidates, rival candidates, candidates who are still running are said to be favored by the DNC and its processes because they have advantages, those advantages being an appeal in the early voting states or there’s this general idea that there is a moderate white guy advantage.

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S1: I don’t know. I can’t prove that there is. There might be. I do live in America. I know who’s been president and who’s often the candidate. But it’s hard to nail down to really prove an actual advantage conferred to middle of the road white guys. And even if there were. Think about it like this because we’re always told that Pete brewdog edge is the recipient of that advantage. Well, what about Tim Ryan, John Delaney, Eric Swalwell, Michael Bennet, John Hickenlooper, Steve Bullock, Jay Inslee, Seth Moulton and also not-so mout moderate white guys, Better Iraq and Bill de Blasio. Even if there was an advantage or a slot for a middle of the road white guy, you know. But a judge did something to earn that slot. But all of those failed candidates who I have mentioned have in common and Bennett is still running, I should say, but. What they have in common is a characteristic that Julian Castro also shared, which is this a failure to connect to voters. And if the premise is that Boobage is only having some success due to race and gender, you have to look at the growing funeral pyre of expired Caucasians with X Y chromosomes and ask, is it really an unfair racialized process? And even if it is, is it because the process is undemocratic or because it is democratic in the sense that a majority of Democratic voters are white, not just Iowa or New Hampshire Democratic voters, Democratic voters overall are majority white. I do think politics are sexist because America is sexist. And there are a lot of ways that female candidates are punished. But that didn’t hurt Castro. I think it’s quite plausible in America that there’s a lot of lingering racism or perhaps even and this has been pointed out, the perception that other people are racist and this will affect the all important electability consideration. But again, that is hard to prove. What is not hard to prove is that some candidates connected with voters and some did not. And that’s because of a lot of reasons. But the primary one rests with the player, not the game. If you’re a believer that Castro was unfairly punished on his way to the nomination because of race, well, then how to explain the relative success of Andrew Yang? He’s a person of color like Castro, the child of immigrants like Castro. Unlike Castro, he started off with much less experience, many fewer contacts, less staff, less momentum. He didn’t have the keynote speaker slot in a past Democratic National Convention. He’d never as much establishment endorsements or ability to get media coverage. In fact, the Asian-American population in America is about 4 percent. That, by the way, includes South Asians and East Asians. The Latino population among voters is four times that. So in a sense, in that sense, Castro should have an advantage over Yang. The truth is, Andrew Yang just had a message or delivered a message. So the way he delivered it was important what the message was that was important, too. It connected with voters a lot more than Julian Castro did. And because of that, Yang is on the debate stage and Julian Castro is not. Now, Castro is right when he claims that not being on the debate stage makes winning pretty much an impossibility. But that assertion is complicated by the fact that no candidate hurt himself or herself more this cycle by a poor debate performance than Julian Castro did when he went after Joe Biden.

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S16: But the difference between what I support and what you support, Vice President Biden, is that you require them to opt in. And I would not require them to opt in. They would automatically be enrolled. They wouldn’t have to buy in. That’s a big difference, because Barack Obama’s vision was not to leave 10 million people uncovered. He wanted every single person in this country covered. My plan would do that. Your plan would you do not have to buy in?

S17: They do not have to buy. You just said that. You just said that two minutes ago. You just said two minutes ago that they would have to buy. You said they would have to borrow it to buy it if you qualify. Are you forgetting what you said informatics could be in for?

S1: What you said just two minutes ago, the problem was Castro was wrong on the point and mean on the tone. I mean, if his argument is now the point, I would defend him for taking whatever Tony wanted to with Biden. But the fact is, Castro mischaracterized Biden’s plan and was a little bit cruel in how he phrased his objection. And since Castro was only 1 or 2 percent when that went down, he needed to capitalize and create a big moment not to slip from a bungled attack. I want to say this, Julian Castro is smart. Julian Castro had a command of the issues who had Castro has a compelling way of speaking about the policies that are really important to him. That said, I don’t think the policies that are really important to him, like decriminalization at the border or a quick transition to single payer was necessarily what voters were looking for today of Castro’s former opponents have made public statements praising him. That is just good politics. Some pundits have done the same. Esquire’s Charlie Pierce writes, Julian Castro’s departure should make the Democratic Party wonder about how it chooses its candidates and its make the country in general melancholy about the state of affairs. As the election season begins, a couple of points. The Democratic Party does not choose its candidates. The Democratic voters choose their candidates. And I think the country would be fairly melancholy, even if Julian Castro was pulling it out in 0 6 or 7 percent. David Rothkopf, host of the Deep State Radio Podcast and professor at Johns Hopkins, tweeted The Dem field is dramatically weaker without Harris, meaning Kamala Harris or Castro weaker. How cumulatively or per-capita Castro had almost no support. That is not a sign of strength. Castro wasn’t setting the agenda. He wasn’t introducing issues that other candidates simply couldn’t ignore. That’s not a sign of strength. He wasn’t really making anyone up their game appreciably. It’s true that a more diverse field, ethnically diverse field would be good. And it’s also true that a primary works best when it’s a hothouse of ideas and policies that challenge each candidate to be their best. But Castro or Kamala Harris weren’t providing that. I mean, no more than Jay Inslee was. And it’s not like there are no costs to having 10 candidates on a debate stage instead of seven or eight or as was the case early on, twenty over two nights. Under these circumstances, it’s hard for any ideas to be seriously contemplated. Bemoaning the passing of a candidate from the stage comes at little or no cost to the individual boom moaner. Who would object to some nice words eulogising the candidacy of a good public servant? Apparently I would still. It is simply not the case that it is so sad that we couldn’t have heard four more candidates like Harris Bullock, O’Rourke, Ryan de Blasio, Gellibrand Malton, Emsley, Hickenlooper, Swalwell, and now Castro. The Democratic primary is ultimately a choice, not a buffet.

S18: And that’s it for today’s show. Daniel Shrader produced The Gist. There’s a common misperception that producers outrank hosts. In fact, they’re a different species and are encouraged to treat each other as equipment. The gist the saddest thing about Julian Castro declining to run is that he can’t grow a post candidacy. Beard like better a rock because his twin brother walkin’ already beat him to. Poor adepero DIPIERRO. And thanks for listening.