Slate Money Goes to the Movies: The Big City

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S1: Hello and welcome to the big city episode of Slate. Money goes to the movies where we watch a movie with someone fabulous and I am Felix Salmon the excuse I’m here with Emily Peck of X is hello. And we do have one of the most fabulous guests of all time to talk about what I’m just going to come out and say is one of the most fabulous movies that we are going to watch in the entire season, if not all of the seasons. Shazna Nessa, welcome to the show.

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S2: Hi.

S1: Tell me about your amazing situation. Wall Street Journal.

S2: Yeah. So I work I work at the Wall Street Journal and I’m the global head of visuals, so I oversee all of our visual storytelling.

S1: I remember you talking to you a while, probably like a year ago now, and we were talking about this season of episodes, and you said something about some obscure black and white movie from the 1960s. And I was like, Yeah, okay. And I should never not trust you because this is an amazing movie.

S2: Yeah, it was during that point in the pandemic where I was, I just wanted to see films that were not set in the place I lived. I wanted to be in other countries. And Satyajit Ray is an incredible filmmaker and this was all set in Calcutta in the sixties, I believe it came out, but it was depicting the 1950s, so it was just such a great film. I had to tell you about it and I had all these angles to it that were about contemporary or modern city life, modern capitalism, this dichotomy between people who grew up in villages, who moved into the city, you know, the lives of women, female emancipation, etc., etc. So many good themes and Felix something I know you love, which is a bank run. And there were I think there were a few bank runs in there.

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S1: So bank runs were definitely a thing in Calcutta in the late fifties, which is a super fascinating time and I really want to talk to you about it. But like, first of all, I just want to say thank you for making me watch this movie that I would never normally have sought out and watched because it is one of the most beautiful and subtle and just perfectly made movies I’ve seen in years. It’s glorious. And you watch it. And every time that it can take the obviously easy way out, it doesn’t. It just it there’s so much richness and subtlety in there. So thank you for that. And mostly thank you to Satyajit Ray for making this amazing movie, The Big City. Coming up on Slate, the money goes to the movies. It comes out in 1963, which is super interesting in terms of like feminism and where feminism is in the US, in UK and India. And this is very much a feminist movie. But tell me a little bit about how that means something different in India in the sixties and it wouldn’t say the United States.

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S2: There are, I think, still, even today, still very deeply embedded notions. I’m not I don’t even know if it’s only in India, it’s everywhere. But certainly there is still a very deep notion around tradition and honour and Family First. But these are themes we see in other films as well. I think of Tokyo story, you know, the elderly parents who feel. That they’re not being treated well by the their daughters and their sons anymore because they’ve all gone off to create jobs. And this idea of independence and being an independent thinkers as opposed to dealing with the community. So I actually find it very modern. I don’t think there’s a dissonance between how women are depicted in this film. In comparison to in the West, in the United States, a very modern film. You know, to be honest. So I don’t think this is deeply Indian or deeply Asian. I think this is deeply societal, even today. And that’s one of the things that struck me about this film. I rewatched some scenes last night, but there are some there’s some stuff in there that straight out of today as well. You know, the role of women, social change is going on. Like there’s a theme around elderly people that there’s no place for elderly people in this capitalistic society. And that is something we’re grappling with today. What happens as we grow longer, grow older and live longer? There’s an underlying theme around racism in this film, too. If you remember, there’s an Anglo-Indian played by the character called Edith Simmons, and they are children of British colonials who had children with Indian women and they are not recognised by the British in this film and nor are they recognised by the Indians, so they are completely cast out. So the idea of our main character, Arati Arati on a daily basis, having to negotiate, being a traditional housewife and a modern worker and juggling that every day, I think women do that all the time. And I think the pandemic, because we’ve really seen that has been the case during the pandemic, too, where women are taking the load of the burden of being workers and of being housewives, frankly, and looking after their kids and taking care of the household. So I think this is a very modern film. It’s a long way to answer your question about how it’s different from an American perspective. And I don’t think it’s really that different. I don’t think the essentials are that different. I think they’re pretty universal.

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S3: Can we just pause here and just give listeners a sketch of the of the plot so they sort of know what’s up? This was released in 1963, I think, but takes place in the 1950s in Calcutta, centers around a working class family. I think it’s fair to say. The middle class. The husband, Subrata, is he’s like a bank clerk and the wife starts out Arati She is like you said, she doesn’t. She’s a housewife, but they’re having trouble making ends meet. They have his parents are living with them and they have children as well and his his siblings. So it’s multigenerational household. They don’t have enough money. It’s clear from the get go. And so Arati is like, maybe I should get a job. No one really wants that to happen, but also they need the money. So she gets this job selling. And we should talk about this. A knitting machine, I don’t know. And then there’s like a nice, subtle look at what happens after this shakeup in the household. And I totally agree with Shazna that a lot of this is unchanged. Like even though, of course, women now mostly work in the United States, mothers work, I think like 70% or something attitudes about like their main responsibility being as mother and like what is who’s going to take care of the child when he gets a fever and all this, like that’s all still kind of a thing. And like the father loses his job after that bank run and he’s kind of just sitting around and everyone’s just like giving him shit for it. And he obviously feels like wounded and his ego about that. Those are themes that yeah, phenomenon themes, expectations that everyone kind of still has today.

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S2: I love the opening as well. It opens on a commute. It’s very much about the worker. Right. So so Batra is going to work. He’s going to his bank. But before before that, the whole family is just obsessed with money. Everything is about not having enough money. There are comments about how well we only have fish three times a week. Now, did you buy mother’s scented tobacco? But he hasn’t because it’s too expensive. It’s just exquisite. The scenes and the sets are amazing. Those tiny, dank rooms that are just preciously packed with detail. And the audio is amazing too, because you. Anyway, I could go on and on and I should let Felix talk.

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S1: Let me do it. No, no, this is. This is your movie. Like, okay, so I think your ABC. Right. Is very fresh. Is the themes are universal or if not universal, certainly extremely relevant. Today, we have covered a bunch of American movies about the tensions involved in women entering the workforce. 9 to 5, working girl, you know, people. Things like that which have. Although like on some level the theme is theme like the, the whole feeling of them, the, the, like they come from another planet in terms of the way they approach the subject matter and the degree to which the characters are sort of well-rounded humans. This, this just feels like it’s really like every single character in this movie feels incredibly real in a way that just doesn’t seem to happen in Hollywood. And. For that reason, I think, and for many others, including the fact that there’s always this ambivalence that she well, not always, but certainly at the beginning that she has this ambivalence about entering the workforce like this is not one of those standard American movies where she’s like, I want to go out and make money and I’m going to fight the patriarchy and like make sure that I can have a certain degree of independence. Like, she is actually she surprises herself at the amount of independence that she starts feeling and the amount of empowerment that she starts feeling when she gets that first paycheck. That wasn’t in any way like the the reason why she took the job.

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S2: That’s right. There’s still there’s still a very deep level of femininity to her persona. She is thinking of herself as a woman who still who’s trying to help her family. It’s not about being empowered or not being empowered. She wants to help her family make ends meet. She wants to buy glasses for her father in law because he can’t see because he keeps buying crossword puzzles, but he never wins. So. Right. And then and then ultimately, she still she doesn’t you know, she doesn’t resent her in-laws. She doesn’t resent her husband. She doesn’t resent her kids. So maybe that’s a big maybe there is that difference in that she still plays a very feminine role. She doesn’t she’s not competing against men in this. She’s very comfortable in her body as a woman. And let’s just talk about that scene. Let’s just go by that scene where she gets her first paycheck. I mean, they are crisp bank notes and she goes to the bathroom and she has these bank notes open, fanned out, looking at the mirror. At these bank notes. She’s smelling the money. Right. It’s such an incredible scene.

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S3: But then she trades the crisp ones for the the crumpled ones that Edith gets. Does Edith get crumpled bills because of discrimination? Is that what’s going on?

S2: That’s the feeling we’re getting. Yep.

S3: Wow. So I also that was a wonderful. CNN when she comes home and she, like, hands out the gifts to everyone. Like, she just obviously feels so good and happy that what.

S2: She buys, she buys a suit for her father in law and yet, like scolding her and how disappointed he is in her, that she’s working and that she’s changed. But then he says, but leave the fruit on the table for. Okay.

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S1: But I won’t take the money.

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S3: Yeah, yeah. Come on. But I also loved the portrayal of the husband, because at first I thought he was going to be, like, stereotypical and, like, nasty to her about what she was doing because he kind of didn’t want her to. And his father is not even talking to him anymore. And he’s definitely kind of petulant about it, but he’s also very loving and supportive. Like at every like clutch moment he kind of comes through and is very supportive of what she’s doing. That really delighted me. It was like their relationship was portrayed in a really complex way that I hadn’t seen. Like in the movies you’re talking about. Felix That would never that would never happen in Hollywood, right?

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S2: And the film is great. Obviously, it’s an arthouse film and very approachable. It’s not opaque and abstract. It’s very real, as Felix says. And I think that’s because Ray was really obsessed with realism and a lot of French cinema that was also happening around that era where you had these really complex characters who were very rounded. And there is it’s almost like there’s no good or bad. Everything’s actually just complicated.

S3: Yeah, even the boss was kind of mixed. Yeah. Was what was his name? He was Mukherjee. I’m sure. I’m sure. I’m not saying it right, Mr. Mukherjee.

S1: He is again, like with all of these characters incredibly subtly drawn, definitely with the kind of terrible boss stereotypes that you would get in in the Hollywood movie, but then interwoven with, like, genuine, supportive, honest friendliness and. Humanity. And, you know, like it was it is amazing how many times in this movie over and over again, you know, like he would he would give a party a lift home. You’re like, okay, this is where like, you know, he’s going to start trying something. Oh, no. Yeah, but it never happens. He’s he’s respectful of her. Always addresses her respectfully. He genuinely likes what she does. He genuinely wants to help her husband out and help him get a job. And and you’re like, yeah, why do we never see these kind of complex characters with, like, good and bad sides in in any normal movies that we watch these days, even in the great like masterpieces that we’ve covered on this show, something like Parasite, the characters are just much more simply drawn than you find in this movie.

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S3: Yeah. Why is that? That’s such a good question. Is it because it’s so many Hollywood movies are marketed to like. Pre-teens and and and adolescents are something that they’re more like cartoons in the in the way characters are drawn. Is there a reluctance among the creators of movies to recognize people are complicated and human and they’re not good or bad? Like nowhere. People are often portrayed as good or bad in so many areas, like in the culture. So it kind of makes sense, I guess. But this movie does not do that.

S2: Yeah. I wonder if it’s just about selling. Right. If you want to sell to the most the broadest number of people and for people to come to the movies, then there are tropes and structures that a lot of people understand. This one, the Raid film was. And you know, at first I was worried, a little bit worried before I saw I love Ray’s films generally, but I thought, am I in the mood for this? This is going to be really slow. Am I going to have to focus very hard? And I know it’ll be worth it, but I’m just not in the mood. So I kept putting it off. And then actually when you watch it, it’s. It’s just you’re sucked in immediately. It wasn’t. Didn’t feel like that at all.

S1: It’s a bit like Shakespeare. That’s like the first 4 minutes where you’re like, you’re getting into the language of the movie, the visual language and the pace of the movie. And then after that, you just fall into it. And and it’s it’s just it’s gripping. And I wanted to ask you what you meant by art house, though. Like when you say this is an art house movie, do you mean that it was watched more in Paris than it was in Calcutta?

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S2: I mean, that it was a film with an artistic vision. It was not made to sell masses, but it was it was received pretty well. It won. I mean. Well, it’s let’s just say it’s the Criterion Collection. So that makes it an arthouse movie.

S1: I guess what I’m asking is, is this one I mean, it clearly is an outrage film. It’s clearly the kind of thing that someone like yourself who spent your formative years in Paris with would be like, Oh, you know, Sathya just Ray and this great global filmmaker who’s who’s revered among Cineastes worldwide. Is that as well as or instead of speaking directly to the Bengali community in Calcutta or, you know, the the people he’s actually depicting on the screen?

S2: I don’t know. Actually, I don’t know if it was I’m Bengali, first of all. So there was another connection there for me, just to see people in those clothes, to understand the reverence toward a mother in law and a father in law and that and that relationship. But I also grew up in London and I did live in Paris. Now I live in New York. So that to me, that just felt a universal etc.. You know, it didn’t I don’t I think any audience could enjoy this. So to answer your question, it’s like the first question you asked me, you know, I just think it’s an eternal it’s an eternal thing. It’s not a specific audience. He was after an audience that appreciated realism and really deep thoughtfulness in storytelling, where you’re not hit on the head with a hammer the whole time. You’re drawing your own emotions and feelings and interpretations out of it through a glance, you know, through a hand gesture, through a bunch of bank notes being held up through when she puts she puts red lipstick on right as she becomes more empowered.

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S1: Tell me about lipstick. I wanted to ask you about the lipstick. She’s offered a lipstick by you. This. She’s reluctant to accept it, but she does accept it. Then her husband finds the lipstick in her handbag and gets angry. Tell me about this is culturally something that I wasn’t understanding entirely. What is the issue with lipstick?

S2: So I grew up being told I was never allowed to wear lipstick or wear nail polish. It was seen as a little bit scandalous. It was seen as, you know, you’re basically a top, for lack of a better word. There’s a lack of modesty in women who wear lipstick. And I and I think maybe that’s really just insecurity of men at the end of the day, to not want a woman to seem bigger than she is because she is wearing lipstick or wearing nail.

S1: Polish or jealousy, because her husband, before she before she goes before work, before she gets the job, when they’re talking about a hypothetical job, he definitely makes a comment about, oh, you couldn’t work in an office because none of the men would get any work done because they just be looking at you all time.

S2: Right.

S1: Sort of sexist way.

S3: And then he goes and buys her clothes. He’s like, Yeah, I’ll get an advance on my pay and go buy you clothes.

S1: Like, which by the way, can I just mention I wanted to bring this. I’m not going to get the chance to squeeze this in. But do you remember like that was the thing. That you could get an advance from your employer. Oh, remember when employers would give you advances? And that was a perfectly normal thing. And even if you were like a lowly bank clerk in Calcutta in 1959, you could still get an advance. And people like what happened to that?

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S3: There are still some services, actually. I mean, they’ll charge you a big and. Yeah, but it’s.

S1: On third party services like the employer won’t do it anymore.

S2: Well, that was a very nice husband to, like, get an advance so that he could buy her some nice clothes. I just wanted to make one more note on the on the on the nail polish lipstick piece. There are some religious undertones to why a lot of Calcutta is more Hindu. When India was a much more mixed country. And a lot of Muslims believe that if you’re wearing makeup, if you’re wearing nail polish, you you’re not able to do the ablution that then allows you to pray. So I’m sure that some of that has filtered in through the traditions as well of the whole lipstick thing. This wasn’t about nail polish, but I think now polish and lipstick are very similarly intertwined. Yeah.

S3: They kind of thread the lipstick throughout the film as kind of a plot device, and after the husband finds it, I was like, Oh, they’re going to have it out now. But no, she throws the lipstick out the window. I was really surprised that that she did that, but I guess not really surprise because she’s on the side, like you were saying earlier, she’s not like on the side of her family and like wants to be a good wife to a husband and all this.

S2: But she does say something along the lines of whatever you’re thinking. I don’t remember the exact words, but it was something along the lines of, You should give me the benefit of the doubt. You know, stop thinking the wrong things.

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S3: Assume positivity.

S1: Let me paint a caricature movie that this is not, but that I kept on thinking that it was. And Ray kept on fucking with me and making sure that it wasn’t. But the caricature movie is basically this sort of naive young mother housewife in a patriarchal setting is very meek and obedient and sort of second class and winds up getting a job out of necessity. The job empowers her and makes her realize just how important she is and how valuable she is. And it winds up putting her on a much more equal footing with her husband and their attentions. And she has this kind of heroic journey to self-actualization, and she is struggling against the patriarchy, which is represented by her father in law, who doesn’t want anything to do with this journey. And he’s kind of the old fuddy duddy who represents the the bad old ways. And at the end, he comes around and embraces her change and she and her husband achieve perfect equality and walk off sort of hand-in-hand into the beautiful sort of feminist future of equality. The movie is not that movie. The movie is way more subtle than that, but explained to me the degree to which like A it is and B it isn’t that kind of Hollywood morality tale.

S2: Well, I think we kind of got at it earlier on when she maintains her femininity. She’s not fighting who she is. She’s not trying to compete with men, which is, I think, how oftentimes films are depicted.

S1: She never fights her father in law.

S2: She she always respects them. She persists. And I guess that’s a that’s a that’s definitely a cultural thing. You know, in India, Bangladesh, Pakistan and lots of other countries in not just in Asia, but elsewhere, but the reverence that our parents and our in-laws have is still very prevalent today. And I guess she wins at the end through her persistence and her resilience just to stay true to herself, he comes around.

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S3: That’s what I also liked about this film compared to like the imaginary stereotypical version you just laid out. Felix There’s always this like American thing where women get jobs and they figure out their self-worth in the job through capitalism like that gives them meaning. But working girl for this, working girl for this woman, like she does get a job and, like, find herself and, like, get more self-confident. But in the end, she quits the job because she has the self-confidence. It’s not what it maybe helps her find her way, but it’s she’s not anchored to it in like that capitalistic sense. She is herself without the intermediary of work or a job or a boss. Like, it’s, it’s the message is still about you and yourself and your family and not about, like, finding value through work forever or something. It’s a little more holistic.

S1: What she really gains at the end, I mean, she certainly doesn’t gain a job because she quits the job. She doesn’t get any money because they don’t have any money at the end. But she I.

S2: Mean, how about that for ultimate empowerment, she gets her job just at the moment. Her husband doesn’t want her to.

S1: Yeah. Can we talk about the quit rate? You know.

S2: This is the.

S3: Great book, but.

S1: This is in, you know, in economics, the way you measure, one of the main ways that economists measure how self-confident and empowered a population is, is by looking at this thing called the quit rate. Like to what degree of people quitting their jobs and and yeah, like it took her being good at her job. To get that feeling of self-worth that then allowed her to quit.

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S3: Were you guys? I was like, What are you doing, lady, to not quit your job? Why are you doing this? But then I grudgingly I mean, it’s amazing that she stood up for her friends. Yeah, we should.

S2: We tell folks, should we explain about why she quit?

S1: Yeah. Why did she quit?

S3: Well, okay. So Edith, her Anglo-Indian friend who gave her the lipstick, got sick with a fever. Fever plays a role in this whole movie. Everyone’s getting fevers all the time. So Edith gets a fever, and she has to be home for several days. And she missed enough work where the boss, when she comes back to work, he fires her because he doesn’t believe. He says he doesn’t believe that she was actually sick because because of discrimination and essentially racism. He thinks like she was out partying or something. And so Edith runs to the bathroom and cries. And Arati finds her and makes her makes Edith tell her what happened. And she gets affronted on ithis behalf and goes to the boss’s office and demands that he at least apologize for this. And it’s not right, and he won’t. And so she quits, which is pretty remarkable. Not everyone’s going to do that today or any any time.

S2: Edith is also the character that did some collective bargaining. Right? She got everybody.

S1: She’s the ringleader. I mean I mean, that’s clearly implied is part of the reason like she just started off on a very bad footing with the boss, who from that point forward was looking for a reason to fire her. But yes, there was he was definitely racist. She couldn’t speak Bengali. She’d like, you know, she didn’t fit in. And that image of, you know, the white person being racially discriminated against was something which I don’t think I’ve seen in the movies before.

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S3: Now, I like that, too, because it really turned everything upside down in my head in a good way, because I was like I was like, Oh, they asked the like at first I thought, oh, they asked the white person to bargain for them because she is white. And then it was like, No, absolutely not. It’s very much not exactly what’s going on because she’s the one facing discrimination.

S2: And the tragic thing, too, is that she’s half white and she’s half Indian and is not accepted by either.

S1: There’s that scene in the elevator when Edith and Dorothy are going up in the elevator and they rapidly rail. That’s where they become friends is in the elevator. And they realize very quickly that they have just a few words of each other’s language.

S2: Yes. So Edith speaks some Bengali because she does say some words. She talks she talks about how she’s about to get married. And she showed flashes, an engagement ring. But there’s certainly I mean, it was a lot of visual language that was being used to communicate. Arati was pointing to her Bindi the red coloring on her on her forehead, which is a symbol of being married. And that’s. So, yeah, to that degree, there was that cultural language and visual language that help them understand one another. The signs, the signals that we’re wearing and our clothes. And I’ll make our panel religious symbols.

S1: I was fascinated by the, you know, the I guess, like the post-colonial echoes of. The crossword, which, you know, her father in law loves and sort of centers his life around. Isn’t English crossword, right? It’s like a test of your English ability. He used to be a schoolteacher. He has these, you know, former students who is very proud of and, you know, at the heart of that. And presumably that would have all happened. It’s hard for me to do the math, but that would have happened basically in full on like the colonial era that that was like where English is the ladder you climb to become professionally successful. And, you know, it’s a middle class family. So they out the the you know it’s yeah there’s so much I half understood.

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S2: Like when he says to her a woman’s place is in the home in English.

S1: Yeah. Or or when you know that the they’re struggling to get by on, you know, however many hundred rupees a month. And then part of the struggle is they need to pay the maid for rupees and who you never see. Right. She’s always offscreen screen.

S2: Yeah. I don’t recall seeing a maid. And yeah, the crosswords were pretty hilarious. This this old guy just you have to buy them. He keeps buying these crosswords.

S1: And they come with the price, but you send them in, and if you get it right, there’s like a lot a raffle for the prize.

S2: And he convinces his wife to give him just one last time, some more money to buy one more crossword, cause he might win it. And then with the winnings, he wants to take her. I have to look this place up, Cape Cameron, to see the Bridget. To see the bridge that’s built by monkeys. Which seems like that sounds like an interesting possibly Hindu sort of folk folk story, but so yeah, you’ve got a lot of intermingling of cultures there. But you know, the Brits, the English were there for quite a long time.

S1: So the ending, she quit her job in the knowledge that her husband also has no job in a fit of high moral dudgeon that came out of seemingly nowhere and doesn’t seem to help Edith at all. But she quit her job and sees her husband, who was coming back to try and ask her boss for a job or to try and get help from her boss to get a job. Obviously that’s not going to happen anymore. So on some level, as you know, on a sort of capitalistic level, the movie ends at a low point, but it doesn’t feel like a low point.

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S2: No, it doesn’t feel like a low point because it’s like humanity one in this in this story. And I think that’s very much Ray’s that’s his own feeling about the world, that capitalism doesn’t have to win you over that at the end of the day, humans can win. And I really love the line where she says to him, you know, you’re looking up, you’re in the metropolis, you’re looking at all these tall buildings in Calcutta. And she says, This is such a big city. There are so many jobs, must be so many jobs in this city. Surely one of us can find one might think her husband says something like I think he says both. Maybe both of us can find one. And so that’s like the realization of equality and that’s between the husband and the wife. Finally, they’ve heightened their partnership. They’ve made it. They’ve solidified it at a whole new level. And so I like it. I do know I was reading some background on the film earlier on how a lot of people thought that that ending was a bit cheesy and sentimental, but it’s not it’s not sentimental and they still got to go out and bloody find jobs right in the city.

S1: So sentimental. But I’m not going to hold that against it. Like there’s there’s you know, it’s a bit like people who refuse to use sugar in their cooking, like, come on, man, you’ve got to be able to use the full range of human emotions. And this sentiment is part of that.

S2: Well, they probably went home and had a fight afterwards anyway.

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S3: Once the money started running out.

S2: One thing that really warmed my cockles was to see those kitchen scenes where they’re seated, because that’s how I grew up. My mother was we we cook on the floor, on the ground, seated. So that was that was a really nice connection. And the obsession with fish, you know, Bengalis are obsessed with fish because it’s it’s there’s so much water there as well. But there was this great scene when Arati gets her job and it’s her first day going to work or she’s already like a weekend and she’s seated eating breakfast with her husband. They’re eating breakfast together where prior she would be serving him breakfast. And to me that was a really beautiful scene. So I think there is so much power in these images that that goes so much deeper, if you think about them, than some of the aforementioned Hollywood films that we talked about. But you’ve got to think you’ve got to be you’ve got to be thinking as you’re watching it. You know, you’ve got to be open to it. You can’t be passive either, or you’re going to miss it all.

S3: I hope people go watch this movie now.

S1: Yeah, guys, go watch the movie. I loved it. I thought it was just really folksy. It was. You can see it. Well, I rented it off Amazon for 3.99.

S3: Emily Yeah, also Amazon. But then as I was reading about it this morning, I think you can watch it for free on YouTube.

S2: Yes, you can. But but it’s not great quality. There’s a moment where it all goes, it becomes asynchronous. So the oh, the sound is not synched with the mouth moving. And then there are versions that don’t have subtitles. So if you’re up for a subpar experience, it is on YouTube.

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S1: Or if you streaming it should be out of copyright soon. I don’t know. Maybe we can we can hope, but go see it. It’s definitely worth $3.99. It’s worth $33.99. It’s a fantastic film. Jasmine, thank you for making me watch it. We’ll come to you in a second. But Emily, you agree, right? You love this movie?

S3: Oh, yeah. This is such a great, delightful. I was so surprised and happy that I liked it. I mean, I’m so glad I saw it, so. Thank you.

S1: Okay. Chaz, last word to you. Yeah. Where does this movie stand in your sort of personal pantheon?

S2: It makes me want to watch every other Satyajit Ray film. I mean, I’ve watched a few, but not all of them. And it’s just one of those things that makes you want to consume everything by that artist because, you know, there’s a level of something that you’re going to get. That’s something you’re going to get out of it that’s special and different.

S1: On which note, thank you so much. It’s been amazing having you on the show.

S2: So fun. And we were interrupting each other all the time, which I thought was amazing because that meant we were really passionate and really into this into this film.