The Bridge: Sync Is Both Stranger and Shameless

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Chris Molanphy: Hey, everybody, this is Chris Molanphy, host of Hit Parade Slate’s podcast of Pop Chart History. Welcome to the Bridge. This is burning bridges. A 1971 hit by the Mike Curb congregation, a large scale vocal group formed by a future California lieutenant governor and music business impresario Mike Kirk. The emcee was a regular guest on the CBS TV variety show, The Glen Campbell Good Time Hour. The sunshiny vocal group performed Burning Bridges on Campbell’s show, complete with choreography.

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Chris Molanphy: That TV exposure, combined with its appearance in the 1970 Clint Eastwood movie, Kelly’s Heroes pushed Burning Bridges to number 34 on the hot 100. In February 1971, the Mike Curb congregation would continue to make appearances on the Glen Campbell good time hour until the show was canceled in 1972.

Speaker 2: The U.S.. For me this.

Chris Molanphy: By the way, you might say Burning Bridges had TV in its lineage. It was co-written by Lalo Schifrin. The man more famous for writing the theme to the espionage thriller series Mission Impossible. Burning Bridges was a very different kind of TV and movie tune, and you might say was a bridge to the next phase of Shiffrin’s celebrated career. And these mini episodes, bridge are full length monthly episodes. Give us a chance to expand on those episode topics and enjoy some trivia. This month, I’m joined by a good friend and expert in her field who knows quite a lot about the mysterious world of TV and movies, Sync writes.

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Chris Molanphy: Mara Kuge is president and founder of Superior Music Corporation. Cookie has spent close to two decades in music publishing with extensive experience in both A&R and Sync. She has placed hundreds of songs in various media, including The High Strung The Luck You Got as the theme to Showtime’s Shameless and projects like Killing Eve Succession and The Twilight series. She has also signed dozens of major songwriters to publishing deals, including the National Grizzly Bear and Sleater-Kinney Mara Kuge. Welcome to the Bridge.

Speaker 3: Thank you for having me.

Chris Molanphy: Oh, it’s a pleasure to have you and briefly to kick this off. This whole episode was inspired and, you know, switched out at the last minute note to my slate plus listeners because of what happened with Kate Bush on Stranger Things. So running up that hill was the jumping off point for this episode.

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Speaker 2: And make a deal with God. And I’d go to small town places.

Chris Molanphy: And I just want to ask you off the top before we get into some deeper details, are you as surprised as me that it’s doing so well or as a sync expert? Does this sort of feel inevitable to you?

Speaker 3: I am not surprised. There has been quite a demand for sinks from the catalogue for quite a while. There’s a few factors at play here, I think, which is that a lot of music supervisors have a lot of familiarity with the eras of the eighties and nineties, you know, from a couple decades ago, because that is when they grew up and they’re kind of getting in the into the place where they’re in positions where they can play some music that they loved growing up.

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Speaker 3: The other thing is that there’s just immediate feedback now from the viewing audience. They can shazam a song. They can stream it immediately because even ten or 15 years ago, if there was a song that somebody heard that they liked, they would have had to find a way to get a copy of it, you know, go to the record store, go to iTunes and download it. You don’t have to pay for it. But now that’s not a factor. You can go to Spotify immediately and raise those chart numbers so fast with just the touch of your finger.

Speaker 3: Right. So I’m not surprised that those two things have come together, but I am pleasantly surprised, to be honest, at some of the less mainstream sinks that I’ve seen pop up thanks to tick tock, you know, things like Pylon being used in a car commercial. It’s really been a second life for a lot of these songs, and it makes me happy.

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Chris Molanphy: Well, and it makes you happy because, of course, this is your business. And I wanted to ask you a little bit about your inspiration. So so what made you want to do what you do? And, you know, as a sidebar, you and I have met in person several times because I’ve seen you deejay your soft rock sundaes. And I know you like to DJ. So do you see music placement as a kind of, I don’t know, disc jockey in for visual media?

Speaker 3: It kind of is in some ways, but disc jockeys have a lot more freedom as to what ultimately gets selected, because music supervisors really do have to run through a gauntlet of producers and investors and directors. And the producer might have a nephew who’s band is hot, hot, hot, and they want to make sure they get a placement which does happen, or they just have a song that they like or something else as a, you know, a different vibe. So in some ways it is being like that and in some ways it’s also being a psychologist trying to figure out what your producer is really talking about. When they say they want something that sounds more blue.

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Chris Molanphy: And you’re like blue, that’s a color. What does that mean exactly?

Speaker 3: Yeah. Do they mean the blues or do they just feel, you know, a little synesthesia?

Chris Molanphy: That’s so interesting. So there’s like a psychological component to what you do, where you’re there asking for your help. These producers, and sometimes they have don’t know what they want. And it’s partially your job to help guide them to what they want. Am I right about that?

Speaker 3: Exactly. I do both music supervision and music pitching with my company, Superior Music Corporation. So I kind of see both sides of how it works. As a pitching person, I’m trying to get them to use the songs that are in my catalog that I think are a good fit, which means I have to go through my catalog, select what I have, and select what I think that that supervisor is going to think is a good fit for with the info they’ve provided to me. And music supervisors have to go through all the submissions they received, everything they’ve picked out on their own to try to figure out what their boss is want that’s going to make it through to the final project. And plus, there’s budgets to be considered, which is something a deejay would never have to think about, right?

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Chris Molanphy: I mean, when you say a gauntlet, the word you use before you really mean it’s like getting over hoops and hurdles left, right and center right.

Speaker 3: It really is. I mean, for every song that gets placed, I could pitch hundreds of songs by that artist and just get one placement. And it’s just a big, you know, trying to figure out who is looking for what and what is going to fit their budget. A lot of times producers got into producing because they love film or they love TV and they don’t know much about music, but they know that they love A Day in the Life by the Beatles, and that’s the song they want for their opening title. But they only have $5,000 bills.

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Speaker 4: My. Then it’s gone.

Chris Molanphy: Something tells me they’re not getting a day in the life for that price.

Speaker 3: It’s really, really, really unlikely. So it is the job of the music publishers and the pitching people and the supervisors to come up with some lower budget options, clearer options that are going to work with the budget that they have. It’s a combination of budgeting, papering, a lot of things that are less exciting than just picking out songs.

Chris Molanphy: I mean, not to be too cute. You just use the phrase a day in the life, but can you walk us through a typical day if there is such a thing as president of a music publishing company? Like are you interacting mostly with artists or other entities like TV and movie producers? Little of everything.

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Speaker 3: Well, yeah. I deal with the music supervisors much more frequently than the producers. And there’s a network of music supervisors that, you know, it’s a lot bigger now than it used to be. But there’s supervisors and pitching people who kind of know each other and people work with their trusted sources. But on a day to day basis, I’m doing a lot of client service, a lot of artists who have new releases coming out. They have new songs to be set up. They have noticed something is wrong on ASKAP or BMI or C sack. Not necessarily that there’s anything wrong with any of those, but something may have been submitted incorrectly by a prior publisher or publishing administrator. You know, things like that.

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Speaker 3: People want to be set up with co-writes, you know, different TV shows. They’re hoping their songs could be pitched to certain shows. And I’m doing a lot of papering, a lot of negotiating of deals, trying to find songs to help fit people’s budgets and sending options to them. Sometimes music supervisors just want the hot new stuff that they can pitch for their projects. Sometimes it’s so specific, like we need songs released before August 22nd, 1976, and they must clear for this amount and they must, you know, have this tempo. It really, really depends.

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Chris Molanphy: Right. And the specificity, I mean, speaking of stranger things, to go back to that example, I mean, this current season is set in 1986, so the first song is a late 85 song is right on point and people notice when you’re anachronistic or out of time. So these details matter. If you’re talking about a period movie or a period TV show.

Speaker 3: They absolutely do. I just worked on placing a song in Angelyne, which was Bates Motel’s Dedication, Bates Motel. If you saw the Sparks documentary, they were the band that met Sparks at the farmer’s market and then joined Spark.

Speaker 2: This allegation last night below me.

Speaker 3: Wow. So they had the song dedication that they had not yet recorded, but were playing live in the clubs before 1978 when this scene took place. So interesting. Yes. So I had to make sure that they were out and about playing that song in this venue during that time period. And if you look at the Angelyne playlist, if you if you see what they used, I mean, they were just spot on with everything time wise, you know, songs that would have been played in Los Angeles. Like they did a very thorough job on that.

Chris Molanphy: So since this is a chart show Hit Parade, I’d love to know if turning placed songs into hits is part of your overall mission, or is it just too hard to engineer that and it’s something you don’t even think about?

Speaker 3: I would love it if it happened, but I have so little control over getting it into the circumstances in which it could be a hit. So I would say it’s a nice cherry on the top when it happens. But for a while I really did have to do a lot of client expectation management regarding that because a lot of managers were hoping that they could get a placement that would coincide for a specific single in a specific timeframe. And that is just not something that from my side I could ever guarantee. And if I get it, it is just a really, really lucky bonus.

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Chris Molanphy: And to use the word you used before, it’s a gauntlet, right? I mean, think of all the things that can go wrong. Netflix decides to wait six extra months to drop the show. You can’t perfect these things or time these things down to the week.

Speaker 3: Not even close. And, you know, a lot of times you can have a great placement and they’ll just cut the whole scene from the show, which has happened before, and it’s happened the night before the show. So I always say I don’t believe any placement has actually happened until I hear it on the TV show or see it in the film itself, because so many things can really even change from the editing room till it makes it onto the screen.

Chris Molanphy: I was going to ask you if you have any good war stories, a story or two you can tell about landing a song in a high profile TV show or movie that you didn’t think would happen or, you know, surprised you or whatever.

Speaker 3: I hope you don’t mind my using one that you mentioned, but the high strung is the luck you got was just one of the biggest joys of my life as far as my career. I mean, that band was working so hard. They were touring, no exaggeration. Probably 250 dates a year and kind.

Chris Molanphy: Of, wow.

Speaker 3: Playing the same venues every time. They weren’t really getting any bigger. I had gotten them some smaller sinks, nothing that was too groundbreaking for them. There was a movie where Eva Longoria was a ghost and I got them a background placement and that. But then when I pitched them, I actually had pitched them just for some general usages in Shameless. And the music supervisor for Shameless and Klein came back to me and said, You know, this could be great for our theme song. You think the band would be up for it? And I was just like, Probably.

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Chris Molanphy: You guys. And meanwhile you’re like jumping up and down on the inside, right?

Speaker 3: Yeah. I mean, it’s it was pretty exciting. But, you know, you don’t know what they’re going to be offering and you don’t know maybe the band for some reason is against something or other. But anyway, that one, we were able to negotiate successfully, but it’s made a really significant difference in that band’s life. And, you know, Josh Malaman, who is the singer and one of the really the primary songwriter for the high strung, has had time now to pursue his second career as a very successful horror author. And Wow, Bird Box was actually written on the high strung tour bus while they were touring. Yeah, that was pretty cool. So now he has had clearly time to get his writing career up and going and is tremendously successful in that field.

Chris Molanphy: So like that placement is like the proverbial butterfly flapping its wings that has like effects that you can’t possibly even predict, including on this one author’s life, right?

Speaker 3: Yes, except I do think that no matter what, Josh would have been successful because he was just so good. But it did give him a little bit of freedom to just have some money that was going to come in and the rest of the band too, which is nice because they were really working hard. I mean, they I you can only keep up that touring lifestyle for so many decades.

Chris Molanphy: I also wanted to ask you, looking outside of your immediate purview, about favorite song placements that you’ve admired, maybe they’re outside of your shop.

Speaker 3: Valley Girl had actually a Sync that I represent, which is two thirds of which is a million miles away by the slim souls. Now, I didn’t place it because I was in high school or junior high when this film came out. But I do like the usage of a million miles away in Valley Girl by the poem Souls.

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Speaker 3: But this is one where I don’t represent the band. This is Sparks and there is a placement of Eaten by the Monster of Love. I don’t want to give any spoilers for a 40 year old movie, but it’s just a scene where a kid comes home and it’s playing Eaten by the Monster of Love as the main soundtrack. And he walks upstairs and you just expect something is going to happen and the song ends in something different and kind of better has happened. And I just think that’s a really, really fantastic usage of a song. It just fits the pace so well of the scene. It just gets you excited about the song and the song is just great. So that’s probably one of my one of my favorites.

Speaker 2: It’s hard to fight it off. Much for Harry Truman and Bob Dole by the most, though.

Chris Molanphy: I also love the way you describe what you like about it. It isn’t just that the song is awesome and the movie’s awesome. It’s like the usage is important. This is a point I was trying to make in my episode is that when viewers, whether it’s a movie or a TV show, fuse with what’s happening on the screen, their attachment to the song just grows. That’s stronger, right?

Speaker 3: That’s exactly the element. Yeah, I agree. I mean, there are songs that people associate with the Sync decades later, like Layla in Goodfellas, that ending piano part. It’s just every time I hear that, I associate it with that scene, even though I had heard the song hundreds and hundreds of times before.

Speaker 4: Jimmy was cutting every link between himself and the robbery, but it had nothing to do with me.

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Speaker 3: But a good Sync just really has that power. It’s kind of a little bit of a monoculture. Again, you know, where a lot of people are watching the same show and hearing the same Sync and going to the same music services to download and listen to it. And we’re all on the same page, or a lot of us are on the same page about this song from the Eighties by Kate Bush.

Chris Molanphy: This is a bit of a nitty gritty question, but for you, is getting a song placed on a TV show ultimately better for a career than a movie? Because I imagine if you score the show’s theme as in your example with Shameless, that can be quite lucrative, right?

Speaker 3: It can. But a lot of theme songs are owned by the studio and created for the studios as a work for hire. So it’s actually not that frequent that an existing song gets licensed for an opening title. Plus, opening titles have gotten pretty short lately. So it just really depends. I mean, there still are some good syncs that I, you know, that happen lately from existing songs. But I actually think a TV show or a film or even a commercial can still have a really big impact or a video game can have a big impact.

Chris Molanphy: Great point. Do you see the rise of streaming TV as a net positive or negative for what you do? Because I imagine the monetary rewards are more limited when seasons are shorter. But then again, there’s just so much content now that’s hungry for your artist songs. Where do you come out on that?

Speaker 3: It tends to be more placements for less money. There’s more projects out there. But, you know, whenever any kind of new media launches, two things happen. One is it’s used for porn. Two is that people try to get the licensing fees down. It happens all the time. And with streaming for a while, you know, there was kind of a lot of, well, look, you know, it’s streaming, it’s the Internet. It’s not really the same thing as TV. That argument has clearly gone out the window now, but there still are a lot a lot of shows out there.

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Speaker 3: I think expectations have changed in the past ten years. And it really was an expectation that people were going to break brand new bands via commercials or big placements. Sync is the new radio, but I haven’t heard anyone say Sync is the new radio since Spotify came around, which is fine by me because then there’s less expectations that I’m going to break a new hit and there’s a lot more happiness when I get a placement for a band that has been broken up for 45 years and they’ve all moved on to new jobs. Most of them own studios or they’re producing, but a lot of them have just gone on to other careers. The real estate agents, they haven’t thought about their bands in a while, and I’m really happy when I can get a placement for somebody from a band that they were in, in high school or a band they were in forever ago. And everybody’s happy about it. People like discovering new bands and people like having their bands discovered.

Chris Molanphy: That seems like a wonderfully happy way to wrap this up. I just want to say thanks again, Mara, for taking the time to talk with us. What’s the best way for folks to keep up with you and the goings on at Superior Music Corporation?

Speaker 3: I have a website, Superior Music Pub, pub dot com and a lot of my placements and just general news can be found on my Instagram which is at m a r a underscore. K u g Mara Kuge.

Chris Molanphy: Thanks so much for joining us for Hit Parade The Bridge.

Speaker 3: Thank you so much for having me.

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Speaker 5: When you walk through the garden, you got to watch your back. Well, I beg your pardon. Walk the straight and narrow tread.

Chris Molanphy: Now comes the time in Hit Parade, the bridge where we do some trivia. And joining me all the way from London is Johnny. Hey, Johnny, how are you?

Speaker 4: Hey. Fantastic to be here.

Chris Molanphy: Fantastic to have you. Thank you so much for joining us from across the pond. Now, I understand you just got back from Glastonbury, and I think you and I have something in common because I think you saw a former Beatle, as did I.

Speaker 4: I did. Absolutely. This is an unbelievable this is the best Glastonbury ever, in my view. We had Paul McCartney doing this set of his life. Bruce Springsteen came on as a special guest. Dave Grohl. We had Diana Ross. We had Billie Eilish. We had Megan Thee Stallion, Kendrick Lamar.

Speaker 2: Be humble. Hey, sit down. If you sit down, just sit down. Be humble.

Speaker 4: And you know, it couldn’t have been better, in my view. It was an unbelievable lineup.

Chris Molanphy: That has a very wide ranging lineup. It sounds fantastic.

Speaker 4: Yeah, they did a brilliant job. Unfortunately, I’m now sick with COVID, but I think it was worth something to infect anyone else. Then it’s absolutely worth it for that line.

Chris Molanphy: Well, yeah. I mean, as long as you’re on the road to recovery and.

Speaker 4: I’d say I’m getting my my excuses in early for my failure in the trivia.

Chris Molanphy: But fair enough. I myself saw McCartney at the Meadowlands a couple of weeks ago and I to Springsteen come out during that performance. I’ll only throw this in because I know it will delight certain hit parade listeners. But it should be noted that during the performance by Sir Paul, another certain New Jersey rocker came out very briefly. He did not get to perform any of his songs, nor was he asked to pick up a guitar and chime in the way Bruce was. So this this man whose initials are JB J and who will otherwise go unnamed, was only allowed to sing Paul A Happy Birthday, The Happy Birthday Song and not even the Beatles birthday song. So as far as I’m concerned, Paul McCartney and I share opinions about which New Jersey rocker is more valuable. But I’ll just leave it at that.

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Speaker 4: As long as you didn’t have to storm out, that’s fantastic.

Chris Molanphy: I will confess that I did sit down briefly and say, Ah, but then, you know, when he was done singing Happy Birthday, he was off. So, you know, thank heaven for small favors.

Chris Molanphy: Now, honey, we’re going to do our trivia round. I, first of all, as I always do every month, want to thank you for being a Slate Plus subscriber, because, of course, we only open these trivia rounds to plus members. And if you plus member would like to be a trivia contestant, just visit Slate.com slash hit parade, sign up. Now, the other thing I want to mention, because we did something unusual in the month of June, we change topics at the last possible minute. Normally, we split our trivia round into recap trivia and preview trivia. But this month, all three of our trivia questions are going to be callbacks to our TV and music episode. And then, of course, at the end, as usual, you’ll get to turn the tables and ask me a question. So, honey, are you ready for some trivia?

Speaker 4: As ready as I’ll ever be.

Chris Molanphy: Question one What show spawned TV’s first ever number one soundtrack on Billboard’s album chart? A Peter Gunn. B Miami Vice. C High School Musical. Or D Glee.

Speaker 4: Oh, gosh, I think it’s B, is that right?

Chris Molanphy: And I’m sorry, the correct answer was A Peter Gunn. Henry Mancini. And his orchestra is the music from Peter Gunn. LP spent ten weeks at number one. It was later beaten in terms of longevity by the Miami Vice soundtrack, which spent 11 weeks atop the album chart in 1985 and 86. But Peter Gunn was first. All right. Oh, for one, here’s the good news. We’re not switching to preview trivia. We’re just doing two more questions about our most recent episode. So if you’re ready, I’m going to move on to some more trivia about TV and music.

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Speaker 4: Great. Let’s do it.

Chris Molanphy: Question two In the hot 100 era, what was the first TV theme song to reach number one? A The Monkees theme from The Monkees. B The Ventures, Hawaii Five-O. C MFC. B T, ASCAP, The Sound of Philadelphia. Or D, John Sebastian. Welcome back.

Speaker 4: So the Monkees is definitely before. Welcome back. I know. Welcome back. Was was a chart topper. But when I think of the Monkees, I think of Last Train to Clarksville. Being that the number one, I’m not sure that their theme song was a number one single. What were the other two options?

Chris Molanphy: B was the Ventures, Hawaii Five-O and C was MF. SB with the sound of Philadelphia or TSA?

Speaker 4: I think it might have been the sound of Philadelphia.

Chris Molanphy: And you are correct. You puzzled it out. The correct answer is cts0p. Not counting the pre hot 100 number one hit Ballad of Davy Crockett. And that FSB’s mostly instrumental theme to Soul Train was the first TV theme to top the big chart in 1974. By the way, MFC B, which is Philadelphia International Records House Band stands for Mothers, Fathers, Sisters, Brothers, and the minimal vocals on the track were by the girl group The Three Degrees. All right, one for two. Are you ready for question three?

Speaker 4: Let’s go for it.

Chris Molanphy: All four of these artists had an old song revived by a TV show. Which of them did not achieve a higher hot 100 chart position as a result of this exposure? A Billy Viera and the Beaters. B The Bo Deans. C Journey or D Kate Bush.

Speaker 4: Hmm. So Kate Bush did have a higher placing. I think it’s actually the rest of them. I just couldn’t tell you. So let’s plump for the bodies. Let’s give that a go.

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Chris Molanphy: And I’m sorry, the correct answer was C journey. And this is a little counterintuitive, really. While Don’t Stop Believin did surge in downloads after its exposure in The Sopranos, it only a. And on Billboard’s Digital Songs chart, not the Hot 100 Billie Vera song that was featured on Family Ties, the Bodin song from Party of Five. And of course, Kate Bush’s song in Stranger Things All Experienced Hot 100 rebirths.

Chris Molanphy: All right. One for three. I’m glad you got that middle one. But now here’s the fun part. You get to turn the tables and ask me a question. So, honey, do you have a question for me?

Speaker 4: So this is the sort of trans-Atlantic trivia quiz. So I’m going to love it if I can. You’ve obviously destroyed me in with your question, so let’s see if I can trip you up by taking you out of your comfort zone. And fair enough, I’m giving you something a little bit trans-Atlantic. So many artists have topped the singles charts in both the UK and the US. All of the following artists have many hot 100 chart toppers. However, one of them holds the distinction of being the artist with the most U.S. number one singles. Never to top the charts in the UK. Huh? Okay, I like this. So a asha. B Janet Jackson. See The Supremes or D. Taylor Swift. Wow.

Chris Molanphy: You’re going to stop me because none of these is intuitive at all. Like, I can easily guess that any one of those would have topped the UK chart. All right, so it’s Usher, Janet, Supremes, and Taylor. Yeah, I know Diana Ross topped the UK chart with an unusual single in 71 that was nowhere near a top 40 hit in America. But I’m wondering if perhaps the Supremes by some fluke didn’t topped the UK charts. So skip all of the more recent artists and go with the Supremes.

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Speaker 4: Well, that’s nicely worked out, but I’m afraid you’re wrong.

Chris Molanphy: Fair enough.

Speaker 4: It’s actually Janet Jackson.

Chris Molanphy: No kidding.

Speaker 4: Usher has nine American and four British chart toppers. The Supremes got 12 stateside, but only one in the UK. Baby love. Baby Love. Taylor Swift has eight, but only one in the UK. And Janet Jackson has never topped the UK singles chart, despite a career that boasts ten hot 100 number ones. There you go.

Chris Molanphy: Okay. So a couple of follow up questions. You stumped me fair and square. That is a spectacular question. First of all, what’s Taylor Swift’s only number one in the UK?

Speaker 4: It’s her worst song. It’s Look what you made me do. Yeah. Yeah.

Chris Molanphy: That’s not a great Taylor hit. And I and I am a Taylor fan, but that is not a great hit. Yeah. And what is the highest Janet’s ever gone off, you know, on the UK chart?

Speaker 4: I don’t know. She certainly has had many. I think she’s got to number three. Maybe, maybe she’s had a runner up, but she’s never got to number one. She’s she’s certainly had a successful career, but nothing has quite, you know, overtaken some of the artists that we’ve got in the UK. I think she’s been a little bit unlucky. Clearly, Michael of course, has had eight, you know, that she’s never she’s never done it.

Chris Molanphy: So listeners, I pulled my book of British charts off the shelf to double check this. And of course, honey is not only correct, we’ve confirmed that Janet has had two number, two UK singles, at least 324, which is how far this book goes. And they include The Best Things in Life Are Free, which is a somewhat forgotten duet she did with Luther Vandross. And then the very next year, her American number one hit, That’s the Way Love Goes, also got to number two. But yeah, no number ones, which is just remarkable because she does have a slew of top ten hits in the U.K. so go figure. Well, honey, I think we both are winners and losers this go round in the best sense. I really don’t mind taking it on the chin with that question because it was such a good question. I learn something from that question and I hope by getting one out of our three allows you to have some bragging rights.

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Speaker 4: I don’t feel embarrassed. I feel quite well beaten and I’m very happy.

Chris Molanphy: Well, honey, thanks so much for joining us on Hit Parade The Bridge.

Speaker 4: It’s been fantastic and I’ve really enjoyed it.

Chris Molanphy: Cheers.

Chris Molanphy: So normally this is the part of the show where I’d be telling you that those last two trivia questions are a preview of our next episode. Of course, as you all know, if you’ve been listening, our most recent episode was not the freestyle episode that I previewed in our May episode of Hit Parade, The Bridge, but rather our TV and music episode. And as you can guess, this was a last minute decision by me and the production team at Slate to pivot our topic for June.

Chris Molanphy: Given the exciting chart happenings surrounding Kate Bush, Stranger Things and Running Up That Hill. To be precise, we didn’t find out until Memorial Day weekend that running up that hill was even in Stranger Things. We didn’t find out it was affecting the iTunes and Spotify charts until sometime in the middle of the first week of June. And we didn’t find out until the following Monday, the first Monday of June, that running up that hill was debuting all the way up in the top ten. This is truly remarkable and to some extent unprecedented, at least for a song used in a TV show to debut in the top ten like that.

Chris Molanphy: It was so remarkable and there was so much attention surrounding Kate Bush and her feet that we decided at the last possible moment, literally with about a week to go before we had to deliver the episode to change topics and switch to TV themes, which is a topic that I’d been considering for Hit Parade for at least a couple of years. So I had a little bit of background in it, but this was a last minute decision that we threw together. And the upshot, because we’re now in the part where I preview the next episode as we are still working on that freestyle episode, and our goal is to make it our July episode. So do listen for that and the next couple of weeks. This episode of Hit Parade The Bridge was produced by Kevin Bendis. And I’m Chris Molanphy. Keep on marching on the one.