Trump’s Gaffes Are a Virus

Listen to this episode

S1: The following recording may contain explicit language I can’t get more explicit than may let you say it may.

S2: Slate Plus members, it’s survey time, which means it’s your chance to tell us what you think about Slate. Slate podcasts and Slate. Plus, it’ll only take a few minutes. You can find it at Slate dot com slash survey.

S3: It’s March 13th, twenty twenty from Slate. It’s the gist. I’m Mike PESCA. There is an old Chinese curse. May you live in interesting times. There is a new Chinese curse. It is the Cauvin 19 virus. It’s as if the Chinese were thinking, I don’t know if they all got the subtle implication of the interesting times bit. So we live in an age when we can’t expect the president to be good, competent or accountable.

Advertisement

S4: But man, if we can’t get the play by play and tick tock of what the exact contours of his badness, incompetence or unaccountability are, the president, apart from having several personality flaws that hinder him from acting in the interests of the people, also is at bottom a poor, poor communicator. Now might seem that with his rallies and the delight he instills in his crowds, that he’s at least a competent communicator. But he isn’t because he can’t make a simple case or form simple declarative sentences. Compound those failings with the fact that his instincts are to say the attention getting thing rather than the proper thing, and we have the disaster that we’re seeing before us. Maybe you’re thinking, no, no, no, no, Mike. You’re just grading him too harshly. If he wasn’t a good talker, he wouldn’t have that many people following him and supporting him and laughing at him. You just don’t like him, Mike? Well, no. I think the president’s appeal isn’t that he’s actually a good communicator. It’s that he’s taking advantage of the context and the context just being the president helps him immensely. It also rewards any times he deviates from the norm of what a president should be like. It’s a little like being a class clown because it’s easier to get laughs in a class room setting with rules and restrictions than it is in a comedy club. It’s easiest of all to get laughs at a funeral. Let’s hope the president isn’t subconsciously steering us towards that. So with that in mind, we got a speech from the Rose Garden today that really was and I will say this truly the best performance that he’s given in the last week. The markets agree. The markets did not crater during or after the speech. Repeat, they did not crater. It’s amazing.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

S5: The president spoke and the world did not lose trillions of dollars worth of value this time. The reason he had to give the speech was his disastrous performance of a couple of days ago. And the key to that disastrous performance was that he couldn’t read a teleprompter. So this time they gave him words on a script and he came up with this to unleash the full power of the federal government that this effort.

S6: Today, I am officially declaring a national emergency. Two very big words. The action I am taking will open up access to up to 50 billion dollars of very importantly, very important and a large amount of now sometimes when, say, George W. Bush misspoke.

Advertisement

S5: Commentators took sport in mocking him as a kind of supercilious put down of the rubbish nature of that president. And of course, many times during the Trump presidency, we would laugh at his strange phrasing or his language became a little bit of comedy fodder. But I want to remind everyone that after Trump lost his place in the Oval Office address of a couple of days ago and said that his restrictions would apply to not only cargo when what he was meant to say was not cargo, it required a massive amount of time and energy to rewrite the wrong.

S4: It took away resources at a time when we need those resources to re-emphasize Trump deviating from the script and saying senseless things had such a great cost that well, that was one of the reasons he had to do this is addressed today. And still he could not get the words right.

Advertisement

S6: The ability to waive the requirements of a three day hospital stay prior to admission to a nursing home. Big thing. The authority to waive rules to hinder hospitals, ability to bring additional physicians on board or obtain needed office space.

Advertisement

S7: They can do as they want. They can do what they have to do. They know what they have to do. Now they don’t have any problem getting it done.

S5: So after all that and after taking a second to make a snide reference to health care dot gov, I want to thank Google.

S6: Google is helping to develop a website. It’s going to be very quickly done.

S7: Unlike websites of the best.

Advertisement

S5: Trump gave way to a series of scientists and CEOs, all perfectly cogent and communicative. Mike Pence and other administration officials said comprehensible things. And then it was time for the president to take questions in which he angrily sloughed off the suggestion that the administration’s poor response was in any way responsible for testing difficulties. Finally, Donald Trump, who’s been in contact with known carriers of the virus and whose staff member and family was also within contact of known. Carriers of the virus took his time to shake hands with all the CEOs behind him, owning the lips, inviting the virus. It’s so hard to tell the difference. On the show today, it is a long interview. I talk with an old friend who has been living in an area of outbreak for longer than the rest of us. Perhaps it’s a little bit of an indulgence. It’s for me in these days of social distancing. I appreciated the chance to chat a little bit longer and to connect with an old friend. So thank you for indulging me in that. But I hope you’ll also enjoy the talk. And at the end of that, I have not a spiel, but a request for you, the gist listener. You can help the show in the upcoming weeks. You may be able to hear the difference in my talking. The difference in mikes in the studio around me. It’s not a studio, it’s a room. Don’t forget, here’s an ambulance outside usually doesn’t happen in the normal ways. We record the gist. I will be recording from home mostly in the upcoming weeks. And with that, here’s Luke Burbank of the TB T.L. podcast out of the Greater Seattle area.

Advertisement
Advertisement

S1: So yesterday they just brought you live, not live. You know how we do these things into an affected area. The containment zone of New Rochelle now in keeping with that theme. You know, New Rochelle, New York is not the most heavily hit area. You know, it is. It’s the area around Seattle in the Pacific Northwest. So I have a friend and a guest and someone with access to a microphone in well, around Seattle in the Pacific Northwest. He is Luke Burbank. He is host of the show, Too Beautiful to Live. The reference is not to our current situation. Hello, Luke.

S8: Mike, I’m honored to meet the minimum definition of being a guest on the gist. I live near the area and I have access to a microphone.

Advertisement

S5: Yes. And pipes. So what’s we pipes? So where do you live and what is there no containment area in Seattle? But what’s the situation near where you live and near the Seattle area?

S8: I live about an hour and a half north of Seattle. I live in a town called Bellingham, Washington, which is very close to the Canadian border. So I can actually this sounds like something Sarah Palin would say, but I can actually see Canada from my house, which I used to joke, provided me some comfort based on the sort of political situation, just knowing that I could I could walk there with my family like the von Trapps at the end of the sound of music. Now, it feels comforting because if there were a health, you know, a pandemic situation, I could also walk to Canada. So.

Advertisement

S1: So you’re about an hour and a half away. And does life seem I don’t know. You haven’t lived elsewhere, although you’ve been traveling. I want to talk about that. But does life seem different from you than it would in. I don’t know what you imagine life would be like for me in Brooklyn or for someone in Kansas City.

Advertisement
Advertisement

S8: It’s been really interesting because like you said, I live in what you could consider to be the the greater Seattle area. I’ve been through Sea-Tac Airport probably four or five times in the last week. So I’m kind of around it and in it. But I’ve also been traveling a lot. I’ll start by just telling you, I was in L.A. for work this week and I was sitting at the bar at Dan Tana’s Restaurant on Santa Monica in L.A. And I just mentioned casually to a guy I was talking to that was from Seattle. And I’m not exaggerating. The entire bar recoiled. It was like I mean, I’m being totally serious. People, like, looked at me with a great deal of suspicion and sort of moved their food a little further away from where I was sitting. So there’s definitely this sense out in the wider U.S. that Seattle is kind of ground zero. And and where this stuff is, is really happening up where I live. It’s there’s only been one confirmed case so far in the county I live in, which is called Whatcom County. But I’ve got a lot of friends in Seattle. My daughter lives in Seattle. And it is it’s a kind of an eerie place right now. You know, the governor, Jay Inslee, has. Has made it the rule that he’s basically canceled all gatherings of 250 or more people, which also means that I mean, Major League Baseball, you know, generally has now postponed things. But that was going to affect the Seattle Mariners. The joke here being, would the Mariners have met the 250 fan threshold for their opening game and opening, I guess. What game day? Yes.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

S1: Yeah. Sometime around game, you know, 34 when the angels come striding into town and both teams are combined on 20 games under 500, maybe not.

S8: Right. Exactly. So it’s. But here’s what’s really weird about it. In places like Seattle, it’s both kind of a ghost town. I drove through town yesterday from the airport heading up here to where I live. There was absolutely no traffic, which is a rarity. But also certain pockets of the airport were packed with people. And Lake, there are still, you know, neighborhoods in Seattle. My friend Andrew, who I do a podcast called TB T.L. with. He went out for his girlfriend’s birthday. They went out to Japanese food and it was packed. They couldn’t find parking. So it’s like it’s hard anecdotally to really get a sense for if people are self-quarantine and socially distancing or if they’re just living their lives because it seems to be really specific to the place and the time. Sometimes things seem completely abandoned and like a help. Here in Bellingham, there’s a grocery store called Fred Meyer that was completely cleaned out of supplies. And then the grocery store a mile away called Hagon had everything. And that’s kind of it seems like that indicates sort of how it feels to be out here. Some things are weirdly desolate and other things are just like life as usual.

S1: Yeah. Also good for the egos of whoever the buyer is for Fred Meyer. They did something, right?

S9: Right. Although you do you realize, like my friend Libby, who lives in L.A., was at the Trader Joe’s there. She was putting this on Twitter. Of all the things that had been taken off the shelves of Trader Joe’s, in particular the frozen food section. And there was some kind of fish that had not yet been completely like bought out. And she said this is really an indictment on whatever this fish stick is. It’s the one thing no one will buy even when people are panic buying. They’re like, yeah, we’ll we’ll swerve on that particular Pollock brand.

S1: So you mean. Raveling a lot also, mystically, how has it changed? What did you say four times in the last week? So has it changed over the last week?

S8: Well, the flights are definitely noticeably lighter as far as passengers go and the lines at security are pretty much nonexistent. People don’t seem to be socially distancing yet. In other words, when people are boarding the flights, it’s not like we’re standing 10 feet apart. Also, I’ve been surprised I can really speak to. Seattle-Tacoma Airport, the Portland Airport and L.A.X., those are the airports I’ve been in primarily. I have seen a surprising lack of people wearing masks, which I you know, there’s all the data out there. I’m sure you’ve been talking about it, Mike. On whether or not masks are effective. But I would have expected more people to just be wearing them on the off chance they would do some good. I was thinking I was going to be the weirdo on the flight without the mask, but it’s generally people just kind of walking around looking like they’re living their normal lives. So just fewer of them in the airport.

S1: I think that’s a good sign because all the evidence is that masks are only good if you have the virus from spreading it to others. I get a little upset because it is they don’t have the virus, presumably. I mean, the 150 people I see on a subway with the mask. Not like 50 people are have been tested and known to have the virus just anti-science like. OK. Now you’re letting the superstition overwhelm what the science says and maybe even, you know, digging into our mass supply. So to me, wearing masks is a little like cleaning out everything but the fish sticks in a Trader Joe’s.

Advertisement
Advertisement

S9: Now, what about this? There’s a guy in Michigan who has a chain of pet stores and he was offering up those like that cone that you’ll have your, like, dog wear so that they won’t like chewing their stitches. They’ve got a really big one that’s for people to wear so that you don’t touch your face. And honestly, I have been so unsuccessful at stopping my face touching habit in this. Like, I know it’s the one thing that will keep me alive and I can’t not touch my face. I’m about to buy one of those cones. Is there anti-science?

S1: My kids have a game called exploding kittens and one of right.I of the game is a cone of silence. I need to go into their supply and bust it out. You’re right. It’s a lifesaver.

S9: You know what else I did that was kind of odd last weekend, although I saw in the New York Times that this is something people are doing at a weird kind of increased rate. I watched the Steven Soderbergh movie Contagion. I rap. I rented it on demand and watched it as some sort of bizarre. It’s like when you’re going through a breakup and you want to listen to sad music. I don’t know why I did it, but I did. And I’m. I still can’t decide if it helped me or hurt me in terms of my sort of level of anxiety. Is it a good movie just in terms of film?

S8: Yeah, it’s actually I have to say, it’s you know, it’s Soderbergh, so it’s well shot. It’s a pretty good movie. And they get a lot of the science right. Based on what we’re now learning about novel corona viruses and various sort of data projections. Like there’s a Larry Fishburne is saying a lot of things in this movie that you now hear Anthony Foushee saying or whichever government official is allowed to at least say something that’s reasonably true in public.

Advertisement
Advertisement

S9: Know who plays the president in the movie? No president. It’s a very it’s almost sort of documentary style. Yeah, sort of like a lot. Now, this is no no leader, right? Yeah, he had that part right too. If this were TV channel, I would ding my bell for that. But I won’t sully the airwaves of the gist with my shenanigans from my podcast. But yeah. No it’s. It was the movies. Again, I don’t know if it if it’s going to make people feel better or worse, but they get a lot of the stuff. Right. And in a weird way, I guess it made me appreciate that so far this novel, a corona virus we’re dealing with, you know, the mortality is lower and it’s you know, it seems to be more survivable when the thing that’s portrayed in this movie Contagion.

S1: Yeah, well, the movie is always much more the movie always has more hype than the novel. So that’s why this novel, correct, Zach, pales in comparison.

S8: Quinn, Gwyneth Paltrow dies in this one and she would never die in real life. She’s she’s immortal now.

S1: I mean, you don’t die if you’re Gwyneth Paltrow. You’re just consciously uncoupled from the living. It feels good to laugh. Yes. And I want to get to that. But maybe Soderbergh should come out with an update. You know, a new directors cut 2020 version where everyone lives at the end because they followed the rules.

S9: But my house loses half of its value because of the market crashing. Yeah. You know, there has to be some costs. I know you have actual real questions because you’re a real journalist, Mike. But isn’t that sort of part of the weirdness of all of this is that I actually cashed out one of my four one KS a while ago. And like that was the dumbest decision I could have ever made, except I felt like a whiz when the market started crashing. I was like, it’s strange. I like to like, if you don’t own a house, if you haven’t been putting money in the stock market, if you haven’t been doing any of the smart things. This has really been a couple of decent weeks for you because everyone who’s been doing that, I mean, although those things are disappearing anyway.

Advertisement
Advertisement

S1: Look, I think maybe you’ve just hit on why the people who are so into, you know, prepping and buying gold, the hold it has on them, because all evidences, it’s just a worst it worse investment than equities. And for one case, I got to get out for a 1k and medals, but it’s just a worse investment. But there must be some sort of, you know, backslap. When it does work in the, you know, quarter of the time, 20 percent of the time when it seems like you’re a genius, you feel so good about yourself and you may not even be consciously in touch with that. But that has to be part of what fuels you. This see, I told everyone else aspect of it.

S8: The part about hoarding gold or putting, you know, your money into gold that I’ve never understood is if we do end up in a sort of Mad Max Fury Road or Walking Dead, I dunno, choose your dystopian future. What are we going to do with the gold? You can’t eat it. You can’t like you can’t live in. I mean, I guess you could live in a very heavy hut that you built out of it, like. Yeah, I don’t. I mean, other than that, we agree it has value. I just feel like if, you know, flash forward a year from now, worst case scenario, we’re all living in caves. I am much more interested, Mike, in if you were hoarding green beans than if you were hoarding gold. What’s the value in the future of that?

S1: Yeah, well, obviously, hoop earrings will be traded for livestock. Yes. Yes, Mr. T? Well, you know, sit atop a throne of his own making and call the shots. He’ll be declared president. Yeah. And he will not pity the rest of us fools. But, um, I guess I guess the point of hoarding gold is not the entire Mad Max dystopia, but you know, more of a return to the sixteen forties or, you know, the age of Portuguese exploration. It’s a very specific it’s a very time specific vision of dystopia. Right.

Advertisement
Advertisement

S8: It’s like you got off the subway one stop before absolute and total disintegration of the society.

S10: Think about but think about what an indictment that is, what a failure of imagination that they’re like. Oh, it could all go to pot and we’ll never know. And you can’t even imagine with the chaos that will ensue. But what I’ve imagined is the thing that actually happened 400 years ago and no real deviations from that.

S9: Yeah, it is. It’s like I’m putting my money in tri corner hats, wigs and ruffled shirts and gold. What else are they doing back then? That’s pretty much what I’ve got on that topic.

S10: It is so funny. Like it’s not funny. It’s horrible. But what if it all happens? What if the apocalypse happens and then the preppers are like, see, I’m right. And no one needs canned food or gold. Like the things they did to prep were as irrelevant as the way the grasshopper just frittered away his seed corn.

S8: Do you think that podcasting will be a big part of whatever this future is? Because I have found myself because I do this other podcast TTL in this weird position. I’m I’m I’m talking to from my home right now. I know that you’re working remotely. I know that the producer, Daniel, is in some other safe location. So we’re able to do this, you know, in the relative safety of of self quarantine and social distancing, which is kind of means this could go on indefinitely. We could be radio free Europe and even podcast. Maybe the only thing that exists in the media in, you know, a year from now. And is that a good or bad thing?

Advertisement
Advertisement

S1: Should Mr. T do create and. Exactly. And should promo codes still work? It’s all based on that.

S9: Yeah. What will happen to ever lane clothing and the sleep mattress? A few years. Now is the real question on everyone’s mind. I would say yes.

S1: When the markets went down, I immediately said Evelin, what about Overlain? It’s bespoke. So this this is a little microcosm of what t.b T.L. is. And I was wondering. All right. I know basically where you live and I know that. Well, where does Andrew live?

S8: He lives in Seattle, right in the heart of it all. Yep.

S1: Right. So I knew you guys would be talking about it. I kind of sought out and I think fans of the show sought out. OK. What’s the reaction that people are really having? You know, fun, interesting people who you’ve come to care about. That’s not going to emphasize the hype, but we’ll certainly mention, you know, weird things that the news won’t when they’re doing their 2 minutes breaking news, panic in downtown. And yeah, the impression I got was that things are weird and quirky, but definitely not, you know, entirely upside down. But my main question is, did you actually have to have a conversation about the the tenor of the show or did you just go with it saying, we’ve been doing this for 12 years? We don’t really even have to discuss whether it’s in the realm of possibility that we’d change the overall show because we’re living through these times of Corona.

S8: I will tell you what happened without us even really discussing it is we both just sort of, I think instinctively knew that for the foreseeable future, being a podcast that’s based essentially in Seattle, it’s all we’re talking about. So the show sheet from our most recent show, usually there top stories and we try to find some funny, quirky things that went on or we’ve got some stories from our lives about. Usually it’s like a run in in the parking lot of somewhere where someone parked in a way we didn’t agree with. I mean, you know, important hard. Hitting stuff, yeah.

Advertisement
Advertisement

S10: But parking lot, Rotten Corner is a fan favorite.

S9: Yes, it has and has been for years. So usually we’ve got the show sheet with all of these little topics and things we’re going to talk about. And starting a couple of shows ago, it’s just been like, how are we feeling? And that’s literally the jumping off point because it’s like it’s not possible for our brains to hold any other thoughts outside of covered 19 related things. And I don’t know if that’s how it feels all over the country. I think it will probably eventually, like, you know, Washington State is is kind of the jumping off point for this. But I assume that public schools are going to be closing in, probably most states, at least most states that kind of know what they’re doing. And so all the stuff that’s happening in Washington, I think is going to happen in other places. But it hasn’t hit yet.

S8: That’s why when I was in that restaurant in L.A., everybody was there eating their food, blissfully unaware, taking in the news. I guess that Tom Hanks has it, which oddly sent a bigger shock to that restaurant than the fact that the NBA was suspending its season. I’m not kidding you. Both of those pieces of information emerged at the same moment. People were more shook by the Tom Hanks thing. But like, I guess my point is it people in other parts of the country, I think still have this luxury of kind of pretending like it’s not really a thing or it’s going to pass them by. But if you’re living in a state like Washington, where the governor has literally said it is illegal for more than 250 people to be in the same place, it is all you can think about at all times. I haven’t heard one conversation. I haven’t overheard one conversation anywhere in the state of Washington that has not been about the Corona virus.

Advertisement
Advertisement

S1: So I want to ask you two more things. One is Jay Inslee a snake?

S9: Look, I actually didn’t vote for Jay Inslee. Maybe I know was the first time he ran. Like, I have always thought Jay Inslee was kind of a stiff, even though I my politics and his generally align like I’m not king of the Jay Inslee fan club. But I will tell you this, the guy is in an impossible position because if what he does works, he will look like he overreacted. Yes. You know, the only good outcome for him is that we all think he was being a fool. So I give him credit. Like, I don’t think he’s a snake and I give him credit for being very unfun. As far as governors go when he’s you know, and I mean, interestingly enough, I mean, he’s cracking down on things that I specifically do. I’m supposed to have a show in Seattle. My radio show, Livewire, which ideally would draw more than 250 people, you know, in a few weeks. That’s probably canceled like he is he is directly canceling my livelihood. And I have to say, tip of the cap. I understand why he’s doing it. And it’s not fun. But I think it’s the right call.

S1: Yeah. And here’s the last thing. You said this not on the show that’s up there now. But on the last one that I had access to, which was on Thursday, you made an interesting point about how it’s not exactly virtue signalling. But there is a consensus about what the good behavior is and the good behavior is shut it all down. You can’t do anything. You can’t interact. How dare you interact? And the bad behavior, at least among the sort of people on Twitter who are into kind of defining themselves as good or bad, the bad behavior of the things that you’re talking about needing to do, like go out and maybe go to a restaurant. So I guess I’m wondering if how does this play into the observation that, you know, people are definitely using Twitter and social media for a lot of things and some of it’s useful.

Advertisement
Advertisement

S4: Some of it is to enforce norms. But maybe the norms that we’re enforcing aren’t really about the things that are right, just about the things that make us feel most righteous.

S8: Yeah, I have a hard time with an element of Twitter where this happens a lot in politics or with some of the kind of corners of like cancel culture. You could say it’s like on Twitter we’re all standing on this giant like garbage cheap and we’re picking through it. And every once in a while you find a bad tweet that somebody’s put out or a bad take or something that’s the not right way to be. And then you hold it up and you go, I got one and everyone looks over at you like, oh, man, that person got a good one. And then there’s likes and retweets. Like, there’s a certain way that the system is is, I think, set up so that we’re looking for the negative or we’re looking for a way to to prove how we’re kind of better or more WOAK than everybody else. And it’s been interesting to watch the conversation around around this covered stuff in the course of a week, like my radio show Livewire. We did it two weeks ago or more like a week and a half ago. And I was talking to the live audience that came out like they were heroes, like you guys are just living your life and you’re undaunted and like, what a great group of humans, because that’s what was really going through my mind on stage was like here we are not being deterred by fear. And right within five days, I realized that this was, I guess. The most selfish thing any of us could have done, which was get together to stage a public radio show in front of a live audience, so it’s weird to watch that narrative change and the who are the good people and who are the bad people? Those roles kind of sort of get established in the Twittersphere and it all just depends on on the mood that the people on Twitter are in on a particular morning, my whole day, because I get up in the morning and I look at Twitter and then I determine like, for instance, I’m supposed to go to Las Vegas in two weeks with my friends. We were gonna go see David Lee Roth play, huh?

Advertisement
Advertisement

S9: Wait, you are a fan of the appraisal, I understand. It raises all kinds of questions just on its own as a thing for a 43 year old man to do. But the concert is still allegedly on, by the way. Las Vegas is. They are. Absolutely, I think in a ride this thing down to the briny depths lake before they cancel anything. But even if the concert gets canceled, the question is, do me and my friends still go to Las Vegas? Now, if we if we’re willing to sanitize our hands and socially distance as much as we can and try to play by the quote unquote rules, I mean, I guess there’s an argument to be made that we should go to Las Vegas and live our life. Also, I will be very embarrassed to tell anyone on Twitter that I am in Las Vegas voluntarily because I will be in the group of bad people at that point.

S1: Right? Right. It’s so interesting. So this is an instance where Twitter is displaying or whatever. Twitter is a stand in for a certain mindset is a mob mentality against mobs. That’s one thing. The other thing is like, you’re right. In the last few of these societal challenges. Pretty soon after the facts were determined and in fact, the big impact was felt. The right answer was, don’t let the terrorists win. Go out and live your life. Or I remember specifically after Ebola, I did a show from one of the restaurants where one of the guys who came back from Doctors Without Borders 8 and then the Board of Health went in and said it’s perfectly fine and people were still staying away. And I went I did a just from that restaurant because I really desperately wanted to rebut the panic that there was anything to fear. So when FDR said the only thing to fear is fear itself, it was when that was the only thing to fear. Now there is something else to fear and it is scrambling a little bit. The normal reactions of what is defiance, what is not being irrationally cowed? What is the right way to hold your fellow citizen into account or to allow for some level of concern? That’s not panic. You know, it is a really, really weird challenge compared to all the other ones I’ve lived through in my life.

Advertisement
Advertisement

S8: Yeah, because I mean, I we are we are social creatures who most of us gain some sense of strength and safety from being in a, you know, a social environment. They like the more of us there are together, the harder it is for the sabertooth tiger to kill all of us or any of us like that’s still in our DNA, I guess, or hardwired into us. So the usual thing when there’s a crisis is to come together. We’re having a crisis where we’re being told to essentially not come together. And I think that is really, really hard for us to understand, or at least it’s hard for me to understand, because it’s just not the normal.

S1: Luke, I want to thank you as listeners to this will tell. My God, that was longer than agist interview. And I guess I mentioned it before. But it occurred to me that during this I’m really drafting off the fumes of the t.b T.L. Energy and this was useful to me in a combating of social distancing way. So thanks, Luke.

S8: Well, as a as a longtime fan of the gist, I am very honored to be on the show. And I will just remind you and the listeners who have found this to be even moderately informative or entertaining. I will be here in this room with this microphone for the foreseeable future. So hit me up if you need any other bland observations from the far northwest corner of the United States.

S1: Luke Burbank gets up and nothing gets him down. He is the host of Too Beautiful to Live, available every day for about seven years prior to when it even just was available every day.

Advertisement
Advertisement

S9: Thanks a lot, Luke. Thanks, Mike. Stay safe.

S5: And now not the schpiel, but a call, I’ll be working from home. I’ll be calling out to gas. I can go visit some guests in New York. I could travel in New York. We can do phone interviews. But in the next few weeks, we are in need of the right guests to talk about these times. Some of the best medical professionals are getting inundated not only with the job they have to do, but with the task to communicate to the public. We’ve reached out to some interesting people, but I know there are more out there and that’s what I’m asking you to do. If you personally have access to smart people who a national audience should hear about this virus, we’re here for you. We are at the gist at Slate.com. That’s the gist at Slate.com. Give us an idea. Better yet, give us a contact of someone the audience could really benefit from if they hear their perspective on what we’re all going through with Covered 19. What we’re trying to do is lower the social distance as well as the gaps in knowledge. We have great and smart and resourceful listeners. So I say now is the right time to share the resources.

S11: And that’s it for today’s show, Pricella Lobby is the associate producer of The Gist. She was going to see Sammy Hagar in concert, but it’s fifty six miles away and she only has an hour to get there. What should Priscilla do? Daniel Schrader is the just producer. He wonders if maybe that other Web site that the president with throwing some shade on might have been asked. GM WSJ.com, just a theory. The gist whenever a bunch of people hear what town you’re from. And then slowly slink away. Well, now you know what it’s like to be a Bostonian. It is good to laugh, isn’t it? Who? Paru Depp hurried to Peru. And thanks for listening.