Why Tig Notaro Loves Nickelback

Why Tig Notaro has no use for Nickelback bashing, Ranky Tanky performs live and explains the influence of Gullah music, and mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton’s take on performing songs about women that were intended to be sung by men.

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About the Show

Studio 360 is a smart and surprising guide to what’s happening in pop culture and the arts. Each week, Kurt introduces the people who are creating and shaping our culture. Life is busy—so let Studio 360 steer you to the must-see movie this weekend, the next book for your nightstand, or the song that will change your life. Produced in association with Slate.

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Episode Notes

Ranky Tanky performs live in our studio and explains to Kurt Andersen how its music is rooted in the regional Gullah culture—descendants of West African slaves who lived on isolated islands along the coasts of Georgia and the Carolinas. For our Guilty Pleasures series, comic Tig Notaro says why she loves the widely loathed band Nickelback, especially the song “Photograph.” And mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton, a rising star of the opera world, performs love songs directed at women that were meant to be sung by men and tells Slate’s June Thomas how a sense of bisexual pride drives such performances.