Taking Stock of Woodstock

The oddity of Sha Na Na at Woodstock, Jimi Hendrix’s searing performance of the national anthem, how Sly and the Family Stone’s album Stand! sounded a note of hope in a turbulent time, and the surprising, life-changing influence of that other Woodstock—the Peanuts character.

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About the Show

Studio 360 is a smart and surprising guide to what’s happening in pop culture and the arts. Each week, Kurt introduces the people who are creating and shaping our culture. Life is busy—so let Studio 360 steer you to the must-see movie this weekend, the next book for your nightstand, or the song that will change your life. Produced in association with Slate.

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Episode Notes

The Woodstock crowd, 1969.
The Woodstock crowd, 1969.
United Archives GmbH/Alamy Stock Photo

Fifty summers after Woodstock. First, Kurt Andersen talks with Sha Na Na co-founders Robert Leonard and George Leonard about the utter incongruity of a ’50s throwback band taking the stage at the festival. The Jimi Hendrix version of the national anthem on the last day of the festival that embodied the chaos and distortion of the time. How the Sly and the Family Stone album Stand! dropped at a moment of intense cultural and political change, and provided a soundtrack for that fight. And the surprising power of the other Woodstock—the Peanuts character named after the festival.

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