Man Up

Where Mass Shootings Often Start

The police chief in Dayton, Ohio, said it was hard to fathom the killer would shoot his sibling. Kim Gandy knows better.

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About the Show

On Man Up, host Aymann Ismail invites men and women to tell embarrassing, funny, and sometimes disturbing stories about their lives as they try to figure out what they still have to learn—and unlearn—about being a man. They’ll talk relationships, family, sex, and identity, trying to understand their experiences to help listeners make more sense of their own.

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Episode Notes

This week on Man Up, Aymann talks with former National Network to End Domestic Violence president Kim Gandy about why she wasn’t surprised that the shooter in Dayton, Ohio, killed his sibling during his rampage.* She’s been an advocate for survivors of domestic violence for more than 30 years—she once prosecuted violent crimes in Louisiana—and she knows the cost of staying silent on the issue. Yet most of us still do, in ways big and small.

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Podcast production by Danielle Hewitt and Cameron Drews.

Correction, Aug. 16, 2019: This post originally misidentified Gandy as the president of the National Network to End Domestic Violence. She retired last week.