Culture Gabfest

“She Said, He Said” Edition

Slate’s Culture Gabfest on She Said, Fleishman Is in Trouble, and the auction of Joan Didion’s personal items.

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Episode Notes

This week, Jamelle Bouie sits in for Dana as the panel begins by reviewing She Said, the new film about investigating the Harvey Weinstein story. Then, a discussion about the Hulu limited series Fleishman is in Trouble. Finally, they chat about the auction of Joan Didion’s private items.

In Slate Plus, the panel talks to the very online Jamelle Bouie about the recent wild weeks of Twitter.

Email us at culturefest@slate.com.

Endorsements

Jamelle: The Criteron release of Spike Lee’s Malcolm X. Biopics have fallen out of style for the most part. I rewatched it last year and I came away struck not just by the sheer ambition of it, but the extent to which it is such a love letter to classic Hollywood.

Julia: My endorsement is episode 10 of Andor. It’s a great episode in a bunch of ways, but also the episode ends with an incredible monologue by Stellan Sarsgaard. It’s an incredible piece of writing and performance.

Steve: I like this song. I don’t know much about it, but a friend sent it to me. It’s Super Rich Kids and it’s a cover of a Frank Ocean song. This version is from Trio SR9 featuring Malik Djoudi

Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Yesica Balderrama.

Outro music is “Did I Make You Wait” by Staffan Carlen

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About the Show

New York Times critic Dwight Garner says, “The Slate Culture Gabfest is one of the highlights of my week.” The award-winning Culturefest features Slate culture critics Stephen Metcalf, Dana Stevens, and Julia Turner debating the week in culture, from highbrow to pop.

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Hosts

  • Julia Turner, former editor in chief of Slate, is a deputy managing editor at the Los Angeles Times and a regular on Slate’s Culture Gabfest podcast.

  • Jamelle Bouie is a New York Times opinion columnist. He was formerly Slate’s chief political correspondent.

  • Stephen Metcalf is Slate’s critic at large. He is working on a book about the 1980s.