Culture Gabfest

Culture Gabfest “Bad Sisters, Bad Sons” Edition

Slate’s Culture Gabfest on Bad Sisters, My Son Hunter, and the death of Queen Elizabeth II.

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Episode Notes

This week, the panel begins by settling into the scenic Irish mystery of Bad Sisters. Then, the panel begrudgingly watches the Breitbart funded uh…indie film…My Son Hunter which may end up being the most interesting text the panel has discussed in a while. Finally, the panel is joined by co-host of Slate’s Working podcast and special friend of the pod, June Thomas, to discuss the recent death of Queen Elizabeth II.

In Slate Plus, the panel discusses the 2022 Emmy Awards.

Email us at culturefest@slate.com.

Endorsements
Dana: A really great audiobook, Shirley, A Tale by Charlotte Brontë (the follow up to Jane Eyre) narrated by Georgina Sutton.

Julia: Two endorsements: first, possibly the silliest thing ever endorsed, the $17 Scalp Brush from fancy salon-style shampoo company Sachajuan. Second: Dana is coming to Village Well Books & Coffee in Culver City, CA to discuss her book, Camera Man, this coming Saturday, September 17th at 5 pm.

Steve: An interview with Harvard Philosopher of Science, Steven Shapin, in The Chronicle of Higher Education by Len Gutkin, titled “There’s No Shame in Being a Hack.”

Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe.

Outro music is “Any Other Way” by Particle House.

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About the Show

New York Times critic Dwight Garner says, “The Slate Culture Gabfest is one of the highlights of my week.” The award-winning Culturefest features Slate culture critics Stephen Metcalf, Dana Stevens, and Julia Turner debating the week in culture, from highbrow to pop.

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Hosts

  • June Thomas is the co-host of Slate's Working podcast. She is writing a book about archetypical lesbian spaces.

  • Dana Stevens is Slate’s movie critic.

  • Julia Turner, former editor in chief of Slate, is a deputy managing editor at the Los Angeles Times and a regular on Slate’s Culture Gabfest podcast.

  • Stephen Metcalf is Slate’s critic at large. He is working on a book about the 1980s.