The Slatest

Members of Jan. 6 Committee Say They Expect Giuliani to Testify

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani leaves the funeral for fallen NYPD officer Wilbert Mora at St. Patrick's Cathedral on February 2, 2022 in New York City.
Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani leaves the funeral for fallen NYPD officer Wilbert Mora at St. Patrick’s Cathedral on February 2, 2022 in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Lawmakers who are on the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol riot said they expect Rudy Giuliani to comply with a subpoena and give his testimony to the panel. The members of the panel spoke about the issue after a New York Times report, which was later corroborated by others, said Giuliani was in negotiations to answer questions from the panel. Although everything is still very preliminary and negotiations could quickly fall apart, Giuliani seems to have made clear that he won’t take the same confrontational stance as other close allies of former President Donald Trump who have refused to cooperate with the committee.

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Rep. Elaine Luria, a Virginia Democrat who is part of the committee, confirmed Giuliani had been in discussions about his testimony. “He has been in contact with the committee,” she said on MSNBC. “He had an appearance that has been rescheduled but he remains under subpoena and we expect him to cooperate fully with the investigation.” Giuliani had been scheduled to testify on Tuesday but he did not show up.

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Rep. Adam Kinzinger, a Republican who is also on the panel, also said Sunday the committee expects Giuliani to testify. “Our expectation is he is going to cooperate because that’s the law, that’s the requirement, same as if somebody [is] subpoenaed to court,” Kinzinger said on CBS’ Face the Nation. “There may be some changes in dates and moments here, as you know, lawyers do their back and forth, but we fully expect that in accordance with the law, we’ll hear from Rudy.”

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Sources tell ABC News it’s still not quite clear the level of cooperation that Giuliani is ready to offer the committee. The fact that he’s even having the discussion to testify suggests he is trying to avoid what could potentially be a costly legal battle. Steve Bannon, the former White House strategist, has been indicted on two federal counts of contempt of Congress for his refusal to cooperate with the committee. Mark Meadows, who was Trump’s chief of staff, has been referred to the Justice Department for possible criminal charges after he refused to interview with the committee.

Kinzinger, one of two Republicans on the committee, said he expects public hearings to begin in the spring or summer. “We will want to be able to take this information and present it to the American people, not just in a report which is going to be essential, but in people, in faces and in stories,” he said.

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