The Slatest

Pete Buttigieg and His Husband Announce Birth of Their Twins

With his husband Chasten by his side, Pete Buttigieg announces he is ending campaign to be the Democratic nominee for president during a speech at the Century Center on March 1, 2020 in South Bend, Indiana.
With his husband Chasten by his side, Pete Buttigieg announces he is ending campaign to be the Democratic nominee for president during a speech at the Century Center on March 1, 2020 in South Bend, Indiana. Scott Olson/Getty Images

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg and his husband, Chasten Buttigieg, announced on Saturday that they are the fathers of twins. In social media posts, Buttigieg, who made history by becoming the first openly gay Cabinet member to be confirmed by the Senate, announced the arrival of their son and daughter. “We are delighted to welcome Penelope Rose and Joseph August Buttigieg to our family,” Buttigieg wrote alongside a photograph of him and his husband each cradling a newborn baby in a hospital bed.

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Last month, Buttigieg announced that he and his husband had “become parents” but gave few details, saying that “the process” wasn’t done yet. In July, the Washington Post reported the couple had been trying to adopt for a year. “It’s a really weird cycle of anger and frustration and hope,” Chasten told the paper. “You think it’s finally happening and you get so excited, and then it’s gone.” Buttigieg had spoken about his desire to become a father while he was on the campaign trail running for president. “We’re hoping to have a little one soon, so I have a personal stake in this one, too,” he said at a rally while answering questions on his views on paid family leave. “We should have paid parental leave and find a way to have paid leave for anyone who needs caring.”

Shortly after Buttigieg announced he and his husband had become parents, former Houston Mayor Annise Parker celebrated the news. “As parents, they will now shine a national spotlight on L.G.B.T.Q. families, who often face daunting challenges because of outdated policies that narrowly define what families are,” Parker, the president of the Victory Institute, an organization that helps prepare L.G.B.T.Q. people to run for political office, said in a statement.

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