The Slatest

GOP Senator on Texas Abortion Law: Supreme Court Will “Swat It Away”

Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA) leaves the Senate Chambers in the Capitol Building on August 2, 2021 in Washington, D.C.
Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA) leaves the Senate Chambers in the Capitol Building on August 2, 2021 in Washington, D.C. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Republican Sen. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana thinks the sweeping anti-abortion law in Texas has its days numbered and Democrats are using it to distract from other issues, including Afghanistan. “I think the Supreme Court will swat it away once it comes to them in an appropriate manner,” Cassidy said on ABC’s This Week. “If it’s as terrible as people say it is, it‘ll be destroyed by the Supreme Court.”

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In a 5-4 vote, the Supreme Court allowed the new law to take effect without ruling on its merits. Cassidy said the only reason the justices rejected the challenge to the law was because of a lack of “standing” and Democrats are now overreacting. “People are using it to gin up their base to distract from disastrous policies in Afghanistan, maybe for fundraising appeals,“ he said. “I wish we would focus on issues … as opposed to theater. It was about if they had standing, nothing to do with constitutionality. I think we should move on to other issues.”

Several Democrats, however, vehemently disagreed with that interpretation. Rep. Veronica Escobar from Texas warned the new law will have “deadly consequences” for residents of the state. “There are folks who want to believe that you can eliminate abortion, but what this law and other laws like it will do is simply make it deadlier, more dangerous. Women are going to take their health into their own hands. It will impact young women, poor women and women of color, and I’m really afraid of the lives that will be lost as a result,” Escobar said on CBS’ Face the Nation. “I say there’s no law that you can create that will eliminate abortion. All that’s happening is you’re eliminating safe, legal abortion, causing women significant harm.”

Democrats weren’t the only ones to criticize the law. Rep. Adam Kinzinger said he didn’t like the way the law was designed to get private citizens to take on the role of vigilantes. “I’m pro-life, but what I don’t like to see is this idea of every citizen being able to tattle, sue an Uber driver, as you said, be deputized to enforce this abortion law to whatever they want,” Kinzinger said on CNN’s State of the Union.

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