The Slatest

At Least 430 People Killed in 915 Shootings Across U.S. in Past Week

A man lays flowers in front of a photo of Ramona Cooper during a vigil held for two shooting victims on July 1, 2021 in Winthrop, Massachusetts.
A man lays flowers in front of a photo of Ramona Cooper during a vigil held for two shooting victims on July 1, 2021 in Winthrop, Massachusetts. Scott Eisen/Getty Images

There were at least 915 shooting incidents that killed at least 430 people and left at least 1,007 wounded between Saturday July 17 and Friday, July 23. That translates into a shooting every 12 minutes, according to the data from the Gun Violence Archive. As part of an effort to illustrate the increase in violence that is taking place throughout the United State, ABC News partnered with the Gun Violence Archive and its stations and affiliates around the country to show how much of the country has been affected.

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Last year, amid the coronavirus pandemic, there were more than 43,000 gun deaths across the country, making 2020 the deadliest year for shooting-related incidents in at least two decades, according to data from the Gun Violence Archive. And the numbers so far this year suggest 2021 could be even deadlier considering there have been more than 24,000 gun fatalities so far. Of the total number of people who died from gun violence this year, more than 800 were under the age of 18 and 174 of them were under 12, according to data from the Gun Violence Archive.

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Of all the gun violence over the past week, 18 are classified as mass shootings because they involved four or more people who were injured or killed not including the suspect. Those 18 mass shootings took place in 12 cities and left 19 dead and 74 wounded. And pretty much every state was affected by the gun violence. There was at least one gun-related incident in 47 states and the District of Columbia. Illinois leads the ranking with 109 gun-related incidents, followed by Texas with 63.

“This week is indicative of a big longer-term systemic issue where people are becoming afraid to go out to parks and afraid to go to malls because they know when they go to a baseball game, there is going to be a drive by [shooting],” Mark Bryant, the executive director of GVA, said. “It’s been a very average week and we should be horrified.”

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