The Slatest

Schumer, Gillibrand Become Highest-Ranking Democrats to Call on Cuomo to Resign

Sen. Chuck Schumer speaks with New York governor Andrew Cuomo during a commemoration ceremony for the victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks at the National September 11 Memorial, September 11, 2017 in New York City.
Sen. Chuck Schumer speaks with New York governor Andrew Cuomo during a commemoration ceremony for the victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks at the National September 11 Memorial, September 11, 2017 in New York City. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is standing practically alone after Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand joined a majority of New York congressional Democrats in calling on him to resign as the scandal surrounding claims he sexually harassed or behaved inappropriately toward staffers intensifies. “Due to the multiple, credible sexual harassment and misconduct allegations, it is clear that Governor Cuomo has lost the confidence of his governing partners and the people of New York,” the senators said in a joint statement. “Governor Cuomo should resign.”

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Schumer and Gillibrand made their feelings on the New York governor clear and joined 16 members of New York’s 19-member Democratic House delegation calling on Cuomo to resign, saying the growing scandals had affected his ability to govern properly. In the state legislature, more than 120 lawmakers have called on Cuomo to quit and leaders in the state Assembly launched an impeachment investigation, which would be the first step to forcibly remove him from office.

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Before Schumer and Gillibrand spoke up, Cuomo was defiant, characterizing the increasing calls on him to resign as “reckless and dangerous.” In a press conference, the three-term Democratic governor insisted “I never harassed anyone, I never assaulted anyone, I never abused anyone” and claimed that if he were to resign now it would amount to “bowing to cancel culture.”

Cuomo’s diminishing allies had been trying to convince fellow Democrats to be patient and wait for the conclusion of the ongoing independent investigations before calling for anyone to resign. But the way in which the New York senators decided to speak up also increases pressure on the White House to take a more definitive stance on Como. So far, the White House has tried to keep distance from the scandal and said the independent investigation should move forward.

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