The Slatest

One House Republican Voted for the George Floyd Police Reform Act. He Pushed the Wrong Button.

A tally of each party's votes on the bill is overlaid onto background footage of the House floor.
Sign of the times. Screenshot Congress video

The House passed the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act Wednesday, a sweeping overhaul of policing in America that takes aim at racial and religious profiling, prohibits many no-knock warrants, and bans the use of police chokeholds. The bill, which endeavors to create a national database to track police misconduct and to make it easier to prosecute offending officers, passed through the Democratic-controlled House by a 220 to 112 margin. The vote predictably split down party lines, but not entirely so: Two Democrats—Reps. Jared Golden (Maine) and Ron Kind (Wis.)—voted against it, and a lone Republican voted for the bill. You might say that technically makes the victory a bipartisan one, but don’t get your hopes up.

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Shortly after the vote, the sole Republican vote in favor of the bill, Texas Rep. Lance Gooden, a Trumpy second-term Republican representing the Dallas suburbs, quickly clarified he mistakenly cast his vote in the wrong direction. “I accidentally pressed the wrong voting button and realized it too late,” Gooden wrote in a now-deleted tweet. “I have changed the official record to reflect my opposition to the partisan George Floyd Policing Act.”

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Even with Gooden’s mistaken support, the bill lost ground since it was first introduced—and passed—over the summer, in the more immediate aftermath of the killing of George Floyd. In June, the measure passed the House by a still largely partisan 236 to 181 count, but did so with three Republican votes—(now former) Rep. Will Hurd (Tex.), Brian Fitzpatrick (Pa.), and Fred Upton (Mich.).

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