The Slatest

Most Americans Think Trump Was at Least Partially Responsible for Capitol Riot

Supporters of Donald Trump are seen in front of the U.S. Capitol Building on January 6, 2021 in Washington, D.C.
Supporters of Donald Trump are seen in front of the U.S. Capitol Building on January 6, 2021 in Washington, D.C. Brent Stirton/Getty Images

The Senate voted to acquit Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial on Saturday but for the vast majority of Americans there’s no question that the former president is at least partially responsible for the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. Seventy-one percent of Americans say Trump was at least partially responsible for the riot, according to an Ipsos/Reuters poll.

That number is divided up among 30% who say the former president is “fully” responsible for the violent riot, 25% who say he was largely responsible, and 16% who say he was partially responsible. Only 29% of Americans say Trump holds no responsibility. Although the numbers are clearly divided along party lines, almost half of all Republicans agreed Trump was at least partially responsible for the riot. Fifty-three percent of Americans also believe Trump should not be allowed to run for public office again. And 50% say they would have voted to convict Trump In the impeachment trial.

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The numbers are in line with a recent Economist/YouGov poll that found 61 percent of Americans believe Trump was at least a little responsible for the riot. In that same poll, 53 percent of Americans said they didn’t think Trump should be allowed to run for president again.

Even though a majority of Americans want Trump to stay out of politics, a majority of Republicans still see him as the leader of the party. A recent CNBC survey found that while 54% of Americans want Trump to remove himself from politics, 74% of Republicans say he should stay active. And almost half of Republicans, or 48%, say he should stay as the head of the party. “If we’re talking about Donald Trump’s future, at the moment, the survey shows he still has this strong core support within his own party who really want him to continue to be their leader,” said Jay Campbell, who was the Democratic pollster for the survey.

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