The Slatest

Almost 60 Percent of Americans Say Trump Should Have Been Convicted

In this screenshot taken from a congress.gov webcast, Senate votes 57-43 to acquit on the fifth day of former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial at the U.S. Capitol on February 13, 2021 in Washington, D.C.
In this screenshot taken from a congress.gov webcast, Senate votes 57-43 to acquit on the fifth day of former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial at the U.S. Capitol on February 13, 2021 in Washington, D.C. Handout/Getty Images

Americans largely think senators did not do the right thing. Almost three in five Americans, or 58 percent, say former President Donald Trump should have been convicted in his second impeachment trial, according to an ABC News/Ipsos poll. That means opinions on the matter only solidified during the trial considering that it’s within the margin of error of the 56 percent of Americans who had the same opinion last week, before the Senate voted 57-43 and acquitted the former president.

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The proportion of Americans who believe Trump should have been convicted is far higher now than it was after he was acquitted in his first impeachment trial. After the Senate voted to acquit Trump last year, only 47 percent of Americans disapproved of the outcome, according to a Monmouth University poll.

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Even though the divisions are obviously marked along party lines, 14 percent of Republicans across the country believe Trump should have been convicted. That was in line with the seven Republican senators who joined all Democrats in voting for conviction, which just happens to amount to 14 percent of all Republicans in the Senate. But the number shows how Trump continues to have a solid base of support among Republicans. In contrast, 88 percent of Democrats and 64 percent of independents said Trump should have been convicted.

If there’s one thing Americans of all political stripes can agree on is that senators voted along party lines rather than on the evidence that was presented during the trial. Seventy-six percent of Democrats, 78 percent of Republicans, and 79 percent of independents all agree the votes came down more to partisan politics than anything else.

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