The Slatest

Girlfriend of Nashville Bomber Told Police in 2019 He Was Building a Bomb in His RV

Branches and rubble strewn across a city street
Commerce Street in downtown Nashville two days after the Christmas bombing. Fire Department/Handout/Latin America News Agency

Nearly a week after the Christmas morning bombing in Nashville, Tennessee, still little is known about the motivation of the bomber, 63-year-old Anthony Quinn Warner, who packed an RV with explosives and parked it in front of an AT&T transmission building in the early hours of the morning before it detonated, wreaking havoc on downtown Nashville. Warner sat in the vehicle while a speaker blared evacuation warnings before the vehicle exploded, killing only Warner and injuring several others. The blast did extensive damage to 41 buildings, including the AT&T building, which crippled telecommunications throughout the Southeast. In the aftermath of the explosion, state law enforcement said they had no file on Warner and had no indication that he might be dangerous. On Tuesday, however, local media reported a girlfriend of Warner had filed a police report 16 months before the bombing, directing authorities to Warner’s home, 11 miles from the blast site, and telling them he frequently talks about making a bomb in his RV.

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The girlfriend filed the report with the Metro Nashville Police Department in August 2019, after police were called to her house by her attorney, Raymond Throckmorton III, who also appeared to represent Warner in a civil dispute several years earlier because of concern about comments she had made. When police arrived at her home, they found the woman sitting on the porch with two unloaded guns nearby, saying that they belonged to Warner and she didn’t want them in the house anymore. While police were at the house, the woman told officers about Warner’s bomb-making comments. She said Warner “was building bombs in the RV trailer at his residence,” according to the police report.

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From the Tennessean:

Throckmorton, who served as the woman’s attorney, told officers Warner “frequently talks about the military and bomb making,” the document said. Warner “knows what he is doing and is capable of making a bomb,” the attorney said to the officers, according to the report. In an interview Tuesday night, Throckmorton told The Tennessean he urged police at the time to look into the woman’s claim. He said she feared for her safety, believing Warner may harm her.

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Police followed up and went to Warner’s home, a short distance away. Officers saw the RV parked behind the house, but could not physically access it and were unable to see inside it, according to the police report filed at the time. When Warner did not answer the door after repeated knocks, the officers left. “They saw no evidence of a crime and had no authority to enter his home or fenced property,” a Nashville police spokesman said. The police department forwarded the information to federal authorities to undergo an interagency record check, but the spokesman said “the FBI reported back that they checked their holdings and found no records on Warner at all.”

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