The Slatest

New Poll Confirms Majority of Voters Think Senate Should Wait on Supreme Court Nominee

Supporters of President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett gather on Capitol Hill on the first day of her nomination hearing on October 12, 2020 in Washington, D.C.
Supporters of President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett gather on Capitol Hill on the first day of her nomination hearing on October 12, 2020 in Washington, D.C. OLIVIER DOULIERY/Getty Images

As the Senate Judiciary Committee launched confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett, a new poll confirms that Americans still think lawmakers shouldn’t be moving so quickly. Overall, 52 percent of voters say the winner of the November election should be the one to decide who will take the seat that was held by the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, according to a Washington Post/ABC News poll. In contrast, 44 percent of registered voters back what is going on right now, saying the Senate should hold hearings and vote on Barrett’s nomination.

The opposition to Trump nominating Ginsburg’s replacement appears to have decreased over the past month. In the same poll last month, which was taken before President Donald Trump named a nominee, 57 percent of Americans had said the winner of the November presidential election should be the one to decide on the next Supreme Court justice. That decline was largely driven by independents. and women While 63 percent of independents said last month that the winner of the election should decide, that has now dropped to 51 percent in the new Washington Post/ABC poll. There was also a notable shift in response among women. While 65 percent of women advocated waiting right after Ginsburg’s death, that has now decreased 10 points to 55 percent.

Although the majority that advocates waiting may be small, Americans are much more firmly in agreement that the Supreme Court should not overturn Roe v. Wade. Sixty-two percent of registered voters say the Court should uphold its 1972 landmark ruling that guarantees a right to abortion, compared to 24 percent who say it should be overturned, according to the Washington Post/ABC poll. Eight in 10 Democrats agree the ruling should be upheld, while 63 percent of independents feel the same way. Republicans are pretty split, with 40 percent saying it should be upheld and 44 percent saying it should be overturned. The numbers square away with other polls that have shown a majority of Americans think abortion should be legal.