The Slatest

Chris Christie Checks Into Hospital as Precaution While Some Had to Beg to Even Get Tested

Chris Christie
Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is seen in the Briefing Room of the White House on Sept. 27. Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie checked himself into a hospital Saturday afternoon as a precaution shortly after announcing that he had tested positive for COVID-19. Christie was well enough to drive himself to the hospital but said he had a slight fever and aches, so his doctor advised that it’d be best for him to be monitored in the hospital since he suffers from asthma. “While I am feeling good and only have mild symptoms, due to my history of asthma we decided this is an important precautionary measure,” Christie tweeted. Even though Christie isn’t having any trouble with his breathing, he already started a course of remdesivir after being admitted, according to CNN.

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The revelation came mere hours after Christie announced on Twitter that he had tested positive for the coronavirus. Christie had spent four days with President Donald Trump preparing for the debate, and just like everyone else, he wasn’t wearing a face mask. “No one was wearing masks in the room when we were prepping the president during that period of time,” Christie said. “And the group was about five or six people, in total.” Christie is a paid analyst for ABC News and appeared on a roundtable after the debate Tuesday night. The network has called on all staffers who came in contact with Christie to self-isolate.

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The treatment Christie is receiving for COVID-19 represents a sharp contrast with how other Americans have been forced to plead and fight for even the most basic of care, including testing. One emblematic case is that of Rana Zoe Mungin, who died from complications of COVID-19 at the age of 30 in April. Like Christie, Mungin had asthma. But at first no one seemed to take her symptoms seriously. She went to a hospital in Brooklyn twice after developing a fever and was denied a COVID-19 test both times. The second time she went to the hospital, a worker in the ambulance that transported her to the hospital reportedly suggested she was having a panic attack. After her symptoms worsened, she went back a third time and only then was finally tested. Mere hours later, she was sick enough to be put on a ventilator. Mungin’s story received lots of attention because her sister, a registered nurse, chronicled her plight on social media. Her family believes that the fact Mungin was Black played a decisive role in how she was denied care.

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