The Slatest

Number of New Coronavirus Cases Is Accelerating in More Than a Dozen States

Signage on the floor of the Times Square subway platform asks commuter to maintain a safe social distance.
Signage on the floor of the Times Square subway platform asks commuters to maintain a safe social distance. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

The coronavirus pandemic continues to move its way through the U.S., shifting from initial hot spots in dense urban areas, like New York City, to more sparsely populated states. New data shows that the number of cases is, in fact, accelerating in at least a dozen states as widespread reopening of large parts of the economy continues. That means the number of confirmed cases recorded in the past week is higher than the week before, a troubling development if you think back just six weeks ago. According to a Washington Post analysis, since the start of June, 14 states have registered their highest-ever rolling seven-day average number of cases, including: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Florida, Kentucky, New Mexico, North Carolina, Mississippi, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Utah.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

California has been at the center of the U.S. response since the very beginning, but it is joined by a number of states that were largely spared by the first wave of cases. In a number of these states, though it’s not uniformly the case, the governors showed little interest in taking strong preventive measures to control the outbreak and were quick to push for reopening, jettisoning what measures they did put in place. The result, the Post notes, is that parts of the country with far smaller populations are now home to the biggest percentage increases in new cases. This week in North Carolina, for instance, the state recorded its most coronavirus hospitalizations so far. The mass protests on America’s streets are also a cause for concern, as the total number of infections in the U.S. approaches 2 million with at least 109,000 deaths.

Advertisement