The Slatest

Giuliani: “There’s Nothing Wrong With Taking Information From Russians”

Rudolph Giuliani looks on before President Donald Trump announces his Supreme Court nominee in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018 in Washington, D.C.
Rudolph Giuliani looks on before President Donald Trump announces his Supreme Court nominee in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018 in Washington, D.C.
SAUL LOEB/Getty Images

President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer Rudolph Giuliani pushed the message Sunday that there was nothing inherently wrong with a political campaign using information from a foreign adversary to help win an election. He would have personally advised against it, mind you, but that doesn’t mean it’s wrong. Giuliani uttered the words while answering a question from CNN’s Jake Tapper regarding Sen. Mitt Romney’s statement in which he says he was “appalled” that “fellow citizens working in a campaign for president welcomed help from Russia.”

Giuliani quickly fired back and accused Romney of being a hypocrite. “Stop the bull,” Giuliani said. “Stop this pious act.” The former mayor said Romney was “trying to dig up dirt on people, putting dirt out on people” when he was running for president. When Tapper pushed back to say there was a difference between opposition research and accepting information from a foreign adversary, Giuliani suggests it’s all the same. “What a hypocrite. Any candidate in the whole world—in America—would take information,” Giuliani said. “Who says it’s even illegal?” He then insisted that “there’s nothing wrong with taking information from Russians” and says it all “depends on where it came from.”

Despite the insistence on the legality of the move, Giuliani said he “probably wouldn’t” have taken information from a Russian source. “I wasn’t asked,” he said. “I would have advised, just out of excess of caution, don’t do it.”

Appearing on NBC’s Meet the Press, Giuliani also refused to give a clear cut answer on whether it was acceptable for a political campaign to use material stolen by foreign adversaries. “It depends on the stolen material,” he said. Giuliani also suggested that the hacking of Democratic emails may have been good for voters. “They shouldn’t have stolen it, but the American people were just given more information about how deceptive, how manipulative her campaign was,” Giuliani said. “I wonder if there isn’t an argument that the people had a right to know that about Hillary Clinton.”