The Slatest

Trump Once Pushed for “Big, Beautiful Wall,” Now Tweets Crude Image of Steel Slats With Spikes

President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up as he speaks to the press at the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C. on December 7, 2018.
President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up as he speaks to the press at the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C. on December 7, 2018.
SAUL LOEB/Getty Images

As debate over funding President Donald Trump’s border wall continued Friday, the commander in chief took to Twitter to emphasize that the border wall wasn’t really a wall at all, but rather a series of steel slats. With spikes on top. “A design of our Steel Slat Barrier which is totally effective while at the same time beautiful!” Trump wrote on Twitter, pointedly not using the word “wall.”

The tweet continued the trend of the last few days in which Trump seems to believe that referring to the “wall” as “steel slats” would make it easier to convince Democrats to fund it. Earlier in the week, Trump spent “six to seven meetings” in a meeting with Republican leaders talking about the “steel slats” and why the term was preferable to wall. On Friday, he said he didn’t much care what people called it. “One way or the other we’re going to get a wall, we’re going to get a barrier, we’re going to get anything you want to name it. You can name it anything you want.”

The difference on Friday was that the commander in chief finally put the steel slats to paper and social media reaction to Trump’s crude image was fast and furious. Many mocked just how simple the design was considering the promise of a wall has long been at the forefront of the president’s platform. Others mocked the idea that the type of barrier could be effective in the first place.

Many joked that the image looked like it was drawn with MS Paint while others pointed at how the president seemed to be particularly fixated on the pointy part of the slabs. “Shocked Trump didn’t illustrate the spikes with the heads of his enemies,” Ben Shapiro wrote. NBC reporter Ken Dilanian succinctly summarized his feelings: “Not the Onion, Chapter 989.”