The Slatest

A Senate Majority Eludes Democrats

The Senate chamber colored half red and half blue.
Photo illustration by Slate. Photo courtesy U.S. Senate.

Update, 2:35 a.m.: Of the 35 Senate races of the midterms, Democrats needed to net only two seats to increase their total to 51 and take control of the Senate. That has turned out to be virtually impossible after bruising losses by incumbents in Indiana, North Dakota, and Missouri. Several key races remained undecided as of early Wednesday morning, but it seemed unlikely any would change the outcome in the battle for the Senate majority.

We have updated this list throughout the night as results were announced. We indicated the winner in bold and note each candidate’s share of the vote at the time the race is called by a major news outlet. (Incumbents are marked with an asterisk*.) Also check out the rest of Slate’s election night coverage.

Arizona

Martha McSally (R)
Kyrsten Sinema (D)

California

Kevin de Leon (D): 46%
*Dianne Feinstein (D): 54%

Connecticut

Matthew Corey (R): 40%
*Chris Murphy (D): 59%

Delaware

Rob Arlett (R): 38%
*Tom Carper (D): 60%

Florida

*Bill Nelson (D)
Rick Scott (R)

Hawaii

Ron Curtis (R): 27%
*Mazie Hirono (D): 73%

Indiana

Mike Braun (R): 54%
*Joe Donnelly (D): 42%
Read more about what Republican Mike Braun’s victory in Indiana means for Democratic chances in the Senate.

Maine

Eric Brakey (R): 36%
*Angus King (I): 54%

Maryland

Tony Campbell (R): 21%
*Ben Cardin (D): 72%

Massachusetts

Geoff Diehl (R): 37%
*Elizabeth Warren (D): 60%

Michigan

John James (R): 46%
*Debbie Stabenow (D): 52%

Minnesota

*Amy Klobuchar (D): 64%
Jim Newberger (R): 33%

Minnesota Special Election

Karin Housley (R): 40%
*Tina Smith (D): 56%

Mississippi

David Baria (D): 38%
*Roger Wicker (R): 60%

Mississippi Special Election

Tobey Bartee (D): 2%
Mike Espy (D): 41%
*Cindy Hyde-Smith (R): 40%
Chris McDaniel (R): 17%
The election will go to a runoff on Nov. 27. Read more here.

Missouri

Josh Hawley (R): 55%
*Claire McCaskill (D): 42%
Read more about what went wrong in Claire McCaskill’s campaign.

Montana

Matt Rosendale (R)
*Jon Tester (D)

Nebraska

*Deb Fischer (R): 56%
Jane Raybould (D): 41%

Nevada

*Dean Heller (R): 45%
Jacky Rosen (D): 51%

New Jersey

Bob Hugin (R): 44%
*Bob Menendez (D): 53%

New Mexico

*Martin Heinrich (D): 52%
Mick Rich (R): 33%

New York

Chele Farley (R): 27%
*Kirsten Gillibrand (D): 73%

North Dakota

Kevin Cramer (R): 57%
*Heidi Heitkamp (D): 43%
Read more about what caused the fall of Heidi Heitkamp, who was one of the Democrats’ most vulnerable incumbents.

Ohio

*Sherrod Brown (D): 55%
Jim Renacci (R): 45%

Pennsylvania

Lou Barletta (R): 32%
*Bob Casey (D): 66%

Rhode Island

Bob Flanders (R): 39%
*Sheldon Whitehouse (D): 61%

Tennessee

Marsha Blackburn (R): 56%
Phil Bredesen (D): 43%
Read more about Marsha Blackburn’s trouncing of Democratic long-shot Phil Bredesen.

Texas

*Ted Cruz (R): 51%
Beto O’Rourke (D): 48%
Read more about how Beto O’Rourke’s unsuccessful campaign will nonetheless help Texas Democrats win future elections.

Utah

Mitt Romney (R): 61%
Jenny Wilson (D): 34%

Vermont

*Bernie Sanders (I): 63%
Lawrence Zupan (R): 31%

Virginia

*Tim Kaine (D): 52%
Corey Stewart (R): 46%
Read more about how Time Kaine’s Democratic victory is another example of the steady decline of the Virginia GOP since 2009.

Washington

*Maria Cantwell (D): 59%
Susan Hutchison (R): 41%

West Virginia

*Joe Manchin (D): 50%
Patrick Morrisey (R): 46%
Read more about incumbent Democrat Joe Manchin’s victory in deep-red West Virginia.

Wisconsin

*Tammy Baldwin (D): 57%
Leah Vukmir (R): 43%

Wyoming

*John Barrasso (R): 69%
Gary Trauner (D): 28%

Note: Although Angus King of Maine and Bernie Sanders of Vermont are independents, they caucus with the Democrats.