The Slatest

The Honduran Migrants That Trump Is So Worried About Are Getting Closer and Closer

Honduran migrants, supporting a caravan of countrymen heading to the U.S., approach the international bridge in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas state, Mexico, on Friday
Honduran migrants, supporting a caravan of countrymen heading to the U.S., approach the international bridge in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas state, Mexico, on Friday
Pedro Pardo/Getty Images

The group of Honduran migrants traveling through Guatemala and, eventually they hope, into the U.S. is currently at or in some cases past the Mexican border.

While the bulk of the migrant “caravan”—a few thousand people—is still in Guatemala, a “small group of immigrants” went into Mexico on Thursday night, according to NBC News, citing an “internal U.S. document.” They crossed the Succhiate River, which forms some of the Guatemala-Mexico border.

The migrant group has deeply agitated President Trump, who earlier this week called for cutting off aid to Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador. He also demanded, “in the strongest terms,” that if Mexico didn’t “stop this onslaught,” he would “call up the U.S. Military and CLOSE OUR SOUTHERN BORDER!”

The main migrant group is gathered in Tecun Uman, where there is an official border crossing into Mexico, and may be able to legally enter the country. The Wall Street Journal reported that “Mexican authorities have agreed to grant humanitarian and asylum visas to a caravan of 3,000 Honduran migrants massing at the country’s southern border” but in batches of about 100 per day.

The migrants will then be able to reside in Mexico for the duration of their asylum cases, and, during that time, allowed to go wherever they want in the country, meaning they can approach the border with the United States.

The Trump administration has been reportedly considering a number of drastic policy responses to stem attempted Central American migration into the U.S., including reinstituting a version of its family separation policy.