The Slatest

 John McCain Buried Next to Best Friend at the U.S. Naval Academy

A hearse containing the body of the late Senator John McCain arrives for a private memorial service and burial at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis on September 2, 2018.
A hearse containing the body of the late Senator John McCain arrives for a private memorial service and burial at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis on September 2, 2018.
REUTERS/Mary F. Calvert

After five days of national mourning, Sen. John McCain’s journey ended Sunday with a private ceremony and burial at the U.S. Naval Academy, where his life of public service began. Hundreds of people lined the streets, many of whom were waving American flags, to pay their respects as a hearse carrying McCain’s casket went into the academy. Family and his closest friends then participated in a private ceremony at the academy’s chapel.

McCain’s son, Jack McCain, delivered a eulogy while wearing his father’s Navy wings. Longtime friend Sen. Lindsey Graham and retired Army general and former CIA director David H.
Petraeus also spoke at the service.

McCain was then buried in a plot next to his best friend, U.S. Navy Adm. Charles “Chuck” Larson, who was his classmate at the Naval Academy. In his recent memoir, McCain said he wanted to be buried next to his friend, “near where it began.”

A flag is placed at the base of the tombstone of US Navy admiral Charles "Chuck" Larson at the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, on August 24, 2018.
A flag is placed at the base of the tombstone of US Navy admiral Charles “Chuck” Larson at the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, on August 24, 2018.
JIM WATSON/Getty Images

After the ceremony, McCain was honored with the missing man flyover formation aerial salute, which marked the final event in the week honoring the six-term Arizona senator. “Four F-18 planes moved through the sky above the U.S. Naval Academy in the shape of a V before the lead plane pulled up vertical, signalizing the passing of the fallen aviator and statesman,” explains the Arizona Republic. That formation is reserved for funerals and memorial events for pilots and other military personnel.