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Trump Gets Lots of “Executive Time” in the Mornings: First Meeting Is Usually at 11 a.m.

President Donald Trump returns to the White House following a weekend trip with Republican leadership and members of his cabinet at Camp David, on January 7, 2018 in Washington, D.C.
President Donald Trump returns to the White House following a weekend trip with Republican leadership and members of his cabinet at Camp David, on January 7, 2018 in Washington, D.C.
Pool/Getty Images

President Donald Trump’s work days are starting a lot later these days than they did when he first moved in to the White House, according to Axios’ Jonathan Swan. The president is demanding more “Executive Time” on his schedule, “which almost always means TV and Twitter time alone in the residence.”

The White House is apparently doctoring the president’s official schedules and Swan got a look at documents that “are different than the sanitized ones released to the media and public.”Although the schedule technically says Trump’s “Executive Time” is from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Oval Office, the truth is he is usually at the residence talking on the phone, tweeting, and watching television. Trump then arrives at the Oval Office for his first meeting at 11 a.m., which is usually an intelligence briefing. Then he’s back at the residence at 6 p.m.

That schedule is quite different from his predecessors. George W. Bush was a notoriously early riser and got to the Oval Office at 6:45 a.m. while Barack Obama liked to work out before starting his day and usually got to the Oval Office between 9 and 10 a.m.

The White House responded to the Axios report by saying Trump is a really hard worker. “The time in the morning is a mix of residence time and Oval Office time but he always has calls with staff, Hill members, cabinet members and foreign leaders during this time,” White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. “The president is one of the hardest workers I’ve ever seen and puts in long hours and long days nearly every day of the week all year long.”

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