The Slatest

Trump and Clinton Roasted Each Other at a Charity Event and Things Got Weird

Update, 11:04 p.m.: Well, Donald Trump called Hillary Clinton “so corrupt” and the crowd booed him before he pulled out his best ISIS material. Hillary faced uncomfortable silences and decided the time had come for her to say “basket of adorables.” All in all, it was about as awkward as we expected. Al Smith IV was pretty funny, though. Watch the complete speeches above.

Original post: If you had the feeling, after watching three 90-minute presidential debates that occasionally veered into Jerry Springer territory, that you just can’t get enough of these two candidates in the same room sniffing and eye-rolling at each other, you’re sick. You’re also in luck. On Thursday night, a mere 24 hours after the last bruising debate that took place without a traditional sporting handshake between the candidates, both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will be on the same stage (at different times) for the Alfred E. Smith charity dinner in New York City. The annual event is named after the former New York Gov. and Democratic presidential candidate Alfred Smith, and the proceeds go to Catholic charities. Sounds simple enough.

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To make matters potentially cringey, however, the white-tie gala is traditionally a light, humorous affair where the candidates show their funny, self-deprecating side as they roast themselves and each other. What could possibly go wrong? The two candidates will also be sitting one seat away from one another with host New York’s Cardinal Timothy Dolan in-between. Judging from the seating chart, Bill Clinton is not attending, but Melania Trump will be there.

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Trump is scheduled to speak first at the event and will be followed by Clinton. What should we expect? “Neither campaign opted to preview their candidate’s remarks and aides for both declined comment on the evening other than to confirm that each nominee will be there,” according to the Associated Press.

“I certainly expect that the dinner will be what it’s always been: an opportunity for two candidates to put aside partisan politics for the evening,” Joseph Zwilling, the spokesman for the Archdiocese of New York, which hosts the dinner, told the AP. “I anticipate that we will have good humor and civility that this dinner has been always been known for.”

A spokesman of great faith.

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