The Slatest

Meet Dorothy Farrell, the 90-Year-Old Cubs Fan Who’s Celebrating With Jägermeister

Dorothy Farrell, pre-Jägermeister.

Fox Sports

Most Chicago Cubs fans weren’t alive the last time the losingest team in American pro sports made it to the World Series. Dorothy Farrell, however, was already a young woman of 19 when her favorite baseball franchise lost the title to the Detroit Tigers in seven games in 1945. In an interview with Fox’s Ken Rosenthal after the Cubs’ 5–0 pennant-clinching win over the Los Angeles Dodgers, Farrell said she wished her brothers and father were still alive to see the scene at Wrigley Field on Saturday night. “They’re all dead now,” she said. “And this old lady’s still living.” How is she planning to celebrate? “I’ll probably have a Jägermeister.”

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Farrell, who’s been sitting behind the visitor’s dugout in Section 31, Row 1 since 1984, is a famous figure at the Friendly Confines. This year, fans started a petition to have her sing “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” during the seventh inning stretch. Though the petition has 3,442 supporters to date, Farrell hasn’t scored an invite to sing just yet.

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In an interview published on the website of the Wood Family Foundation, Farrell said she’s not a fan of the Curse of the Billy Goat, explaining, “I don’t believe in that crap!” Fair enough.

Earlier this year, in a spot on the TV show Windy City Live, she said her favorite Cub of all time was first baseman Mark Grace, adding lasciviously, “Oh, I spent a lot of time with that man.” (Grace once gave her a kiss.)

In that interview, Farrell noted that she enjoys yelling “earn your money!” in the direction of current Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo. She also told the hosts she doesn’t drink before or during games, but after the ninth inning is a different story. “I might have a little Jäger,” she explained, staying true to her preferred German digestif.

And what will she do if the Cubs win it all? “I guess I’d probably die,” she said.

Stay alive for at least two more weeks, Dorothy!

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