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David Bowie’s Friends and Fellow Artists Pay Tribute on Twitter and Facebook

A mural for David Bowie in his hometown of Brixton.
A mural for David Bowie in his hometown of Brixton.

Photo by JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images

If you need any proof of the breadth of David Bowie’s influence on art and culture, look no further than the many tributes that have poured out over the last few hours. The legendary artist, who died on Sunday at the age of 69, touched the lives of fashionistas, rappers, rock stars, filmmakers, theater performers, and everyone in between. Below, a collection of just some of the many artists who found inspiration and joy in his work.

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Musician Owen Pallet had a particularly touching Bowie story to share:

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And his longtime producer and collaborator Tony Visconti paid tribute on Facebook:

And his son, filmmaker Duncan Jones, revealed a lovely photo of himself as a child, with his father.

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Update, Jan. 11, 2016: In a statement to the BBC, longtime collaborator and friend Brian Eno shared his own heartfelt memories of Bowie:

David’s death came as a complete surprise, as did nearly everything else about him. I feel a huge gap now.

We knew each other for over 40 years, in a friendship that was always tinged by echoes of Pete and Dud. Over the last few years - with him living in New York and me in London - our connection was by email. We signed off with invented names: some of his were mr showbiz, milton keynes, rhoda borrocks and the duke of ear.

About a year ago we started talking about Outside - the last album we worked on together. We both liked that album a lot and felt that it had fallen through the cracks. We talked about revisiting it, taking it somewhere new. I was looking forward to that.

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I received an email from him seven days ago. It was as funny as always, and as surreal, looping through word games and allusions and all the usual stuff we did. It ended with this sentence: ‘Thank you for our good times, brian. they will never rot’. And it was signed ‘Dawn’.

I realise now he was saying goodbye.

Read more in Slate about David Bowie.

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