Business Insider

Women in New York Are Now Attending “Egg Freezing” Parties

A technician opens a vessel containing women's frozen egg cells on April 6, 2011 in Amserdam.
Tupperware, this is not.

Photo by Lex van Lieshout/AFP/Getty Images

This story originally appeared in Business Insider.

Egg freezing has become such a popular procedure that according to a recent New York Post report, parties are now being thrown for it.

A startup known as EggBanxx recently invited young professional women in NYC to an informational party at New York City’s NoMad hotel to discuss egg-freezing.

During the $45-a-ticket event called “Let’s Chill,” more than 70 female attendees socialized and learned about the egg-freezing process from fertility professionals, the Post reported.

Advertisement

The party was thrown to drum up business for EggBanxx, which says it’s trying to make the once-rare and pricey practice cheaper. EggBanxx prices for freezing and storing eggs for the first year range between $6,500 and $7,500—about half the price it claims its competitors offer.

Advertisement
Advertisement

And it does seem to be a growing market for maternal women of a certain age. More women over 30 are choosing to have children outside of marriage, according to the Daily Beast, which also said that the birth rate for unmarried women aged 30-34 “substantially surpassed” those of a younger age for the first time in 2012.

No wonder that the response has been “overwhelming,” Gina Bartasi, CEO of FertilityAuthority, the parent company of EggBanxx, told Business Insider. “Phones have been ringing off the hook. We know the interest is high.”

Advertisement

Bartasi told us that EggBanxx will throw another party in New York in September, eventually rolling out across the country in cities like Boston, San Francisco, and Los Angeles in the near future. She said the company is aiming to target women 25 to 38 years old, and would discourage women over the age of 38, as “fertility is very low” at that point.

Advertisement

Bartasi looks at egg freezing as a positive step for the modern, professional woman. “Before, you had your career and you might have ended up with infertility treatments and years of heartache and lots and lots of expense and IVF cycles,” she told us. Now, egg freezing is “an insurance policy. It’s about having no regrets.”

Advertisement

Of course, the cheaper ‘no regrets’ lifestyle EggBanxx offers is still pretty pricey. After the initial cost of $6,500 to $7,500, women pay an annual fee of $500 to $1,000 to keep storing their eggs. That means if a 25 year old decided to freeze her eggs until she was 40, she could have spent between $7,500 and $15,000, not including the original cost of freezing her eggs.

Chock it up to one more expense for leading the “modern woman” lifestyle.

See also: Why Can’t Doctors Agree on How Much Salt You Should Be Eating

Advertisement